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Session:         Page of 592

on you. You didn't. It wasn't that you slipped around to see it. Yet because you read the Times and these magazines, these things would percolate out.

I remember having a conversation with someone who years later told me how he knew everything was happening, because I remember having a violent argument with him about -- it was the time of the Moscow trials -- that one of the bits of evidence against Trotsky was that there had been a meeting with him at the Hotel Breslin in some other city, and I had read a story to the effect that that hotel had been destroyed by that time, so it was phony. I remember mentioning it to this guy, and he was angry at me for falling victim to that kind of stuff. But you see, there are a lot of little things like that that made you question Now for the good news.

Q:

Now for the good news.

Foner:

Where are we?

Q:

The beginning of your career, about 1199. Last time I think that what you were doing was mostly reviewing a lot of the different kinds of things.

Foner:

Programming. And I made some notes of things.

Q:

So why don't you just let loose on that.

Foner:

I don't know what I gave you, but here are the things that I wanted to mention. Some of them were innovative. Many things were adapted from what I did at 65, like Salute to Israel, Negro history program were adaptations, programs for children. But there were some things that were very new or things that I hadn't done there that weren't really brand-new. Some things that were not that new are things like we did a film series, not union films, but on films on social issues. We would bring in somebody. There were Sunday night socials, and there was a showing of films, whether it's “Nothing But A Man,” a Chaplin film. I'd get somebody who would be able to speak about it. Then it would finish with coffee and cake and asking questions. It was a social kind of evening. We did a series of lectures on psychology and psychiatry that were not strictly union. We also established programs like classes. Not only did we do classes for skills, not in the same sense that are done today, but, for example, we set up a series of classes and ended up calling it “1199's Unionversity,” classes for cosmeticians, for pharmacists to be trained to sell cosmetics, and bring



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