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Session:         Page of 592

didn't want to speak. She didn't come. None of her people came, none of her people.

Foner:

Okay. It's not okay, we didn't win. It's not the end of the world, what we did then.

Q:

So we come up now to the period of the late Sixties, and we're finally getting around to the Charleston strike.

Foner:

My lips are sealed. [Laughter]

Q:

I just wonder if you'd like to make any general comments first about the impact of the Black Power movement on 1199, because the civil rights movement has changed profoundly in '67, '68, '69, and presumably 1199 is affected.

Foner:

1199 is affected, 1199 is involved. See, this is a period when I'm very close to Stanley Levison and the Poor People's March takes place. We're involved in it. The Angela Davis campaign--I don't know if I discussed that.

Q:

No, and you haven't discussed the poor people's campaign, which occurred right after--King was working on it when he was shot.

Foner:

Yes. The poor people's campaign, I can't tell you too much about it. But let me back up a bit. In all of the civil rights demos, whether it was in Baltimore to integrate this or to do that, 1199 would always send people. We always were sending people all over the place on these things and they always counted on us to be involved in these things. Then as the Stokely Carmichael movement began to take shape, we were also consulted on that thing. I remember--was it the Selma march? Which was the march down in the South? Was it Mississippi? Mississippi, yes. The Meredith March.

[END OF TAPE 11, SIDE 2]

[BEGIN TAPE 12, SIDE 1]

Foner:

In one the marches, I think it was in Mississippi, Davis went down, and I remember when he came back, he told us about the many, many hours he had spent with Stokely Carmichael, talking about what Stokely was talking about. He would discuss it with people, but it wasn't his discussion that changed anything or impacted on anything; it was what was happening, broadly.

This was beginning to have an impact among some staff and some members. In a very strange way, on the one hand, it didn't meet the



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