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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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Part:         Session:         Page of 999

maximum possible in the way of a bill, because it's very hard to amend bills after you have them, and --

Q:

Well, the Kennedy Bill as I understand from this article I cited, Kennedy -- Mills Bill, is in many ways quite similar to the Nixon Administration's proposal of January of this year, isn't it?

Lasker:

I think it's more advanced than that, much less favoring the American Medical Association. But I don't think any of the bills that are now proposed are going to pass in their present form, or even much like the present form, and I have a feeling that because of the Watergate situation, and the attention that the Congress and Senate are going to have to pay to it within the next six months, that we're not going to get any major legislation like this, in this session. And that means that in the next session of Congress, we have to start all over again. So I'm not prepared to speculate on what we'll actually get. I think we'll get -- we'll get as much as -- you see, the person who'll decide in the Senate is Long, not Kennedy. Long said that if we don't put out a bill, if mills doesn't bring out a bill, he'll bring out a catastrophic illness bill, and he could probably pass it. But that would mean we'd have to amend it fairly fast, because just a catastrophic illness bill doesn't -- youknow.

Q:

Doesn't he have one, Long -Ribicoff, he and Ribicoff together have one?

Lasker:

Yes, he has one. And of course it would do some good. But it's far from solving the health problems or the cost of health



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