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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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At any rate, the attitude of the Americans was, “Well, maybe the British doctors really didn't want to do it!”

Q:

A negative approach.

Lasker:

If the British doctors they knew didn't want to meet and formally cooperate, they should find some that did, don't you think so?

Q:

I think so. Not the negative approach.

Lasker:

Yes, and they said they wouldn't want to go ahead without consulting their British colleagues, and things like that. Well, some British colleagues would want to do it, you know. Some could be founds, especially if there was a government suggestion that it should be done.

Q:

What was the lady's reaction?

Lasker:

Well, the lady's suggestion was that she'd be happy to do anything they asked. Of course, they didn't ask anything. Deeda and I were trying to push the whole business, and she said, “Well, will you send me a memo?”

Well, it finally left that when one of the leading medical researchers from Great Britain would be in the United States in September, they would all lunch together at the embassy. Well, that sounds to me as if it were going to go along in a very limp-handed fashion.

It's really extraordinary how much it takes to get anything tied together. I finally said, after Mrs. Jay



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