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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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Part:         Session:         Page of 999

good legislation. Do you think so in your own experience?

Lasker:

You have to have a settlement between the two different houses, and you settle it by two groups of people talking. I don't know how else to do it, do you?

Q:

I suppose the criticism rested in the fact that it was only the very senior members of Congress who got on these conference committees.

Lasker:

Well, I don't know what mix you're going to take. I mean, you have to decide there's going to be some formula and that's the present formula. Otherwise you'd have to vote on who was going to be on the conference committee. Maybe that's a good thing, I don't know. But it's very difficult to run a government that's this big and this complicated, with such a few people.

Well, we made some progress. In other words, if the bill passes we'll have 45 million more for cancer and 15 million more for heart, which will be the biggest appropriation the Heart Institute's ever had, and 5 million more for Neurology and Stroke in the stroke field.

Q:

Would you comment as a carry on with that, on the major problems which still remain for research to solve in those particular areas.

Lasker:

Well, the major forms of cancer are still not successfully curable or -- with drugs, or preventable with vaccinations. Those are the two goals, cure them with drugs and prevent with vaccinations.



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