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Kenneth ClarkKenneth Clark
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person to the very end. She died with quality and dignity. The nurses said, “You can come to know a lot about a person when they're terminally ill.” All the nurses would say how extraordinary she was. This was important for her, by the way. It was very important for her to maintain a certain kind of control, and not let even pain interfere. She was sensitive to the needs of other people up to the end.

Q:

Dr. You mentioned that she told your son and your daughter what kind of memorial service she wished, and you carried that out. Could you tell us a little bit about the memorial service?

Clark:

I'll tell you about the funeral first. She didn't want a funeral in church; she just wanted a few friends to go to the cemetery. She named who she wanted at the cemetary. She wanted a simple service at the cemetery rather than any kind of elaborate thing in church. And she wanted a memorial service subsequent to the burial. She stated those who she wanted to talk. She was very specific as to each person. My son spoke for the family. Mr. [James] Jim Dumpson, who is on our board at Northside, spoke for Northside. David Barry, who died within six months after Mamie's death, spoke for her work in the [New York] City Mission Society, and on related social services. [Richard] Dick Cooper, who was formerly president of the New York Public Library, on the board of which he served for quite a while, spoke from that perspective of her role as a board member and beyond. We all felt that it met Mamie's desire. It was at Riverside Church. That was the only thing that was





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