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Kenneth ClarkKenneth Clark
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Session:         Page of 763

Q:

Let me go back to retrospection here on the whole racial or inter-racial problem.

Clark:

We might be able to deal with that through biochemical intervention.

Q:

You've mentioned retrogression not only today but before, and you were in a point of time, you were referring to 1954 in large part at to least Brown and so forth. Let's go a little further back. You see that we've sort come the full circle. We're back when [Gunnar] Myrdal said we were when he wrote The American Dilemma.

Clark:

No, not full circle. There have been, as I've said to you before, some significant changes that I don't think even Meese is going to defeat. For example, there are no more signs saying black and white. The more obvious manifestations of environmental, and social, and psychological apartheid have been removed in transportation, public accommodations. When Myrdal wrote the book The American Dilemma what he described, the realities that he described, were blatant latent forms of segregation. Blacks couldn't go to hotels. Those have been removed and are not likely to be re-instituted. What we do have, and what I wanted to say but didn't say in my testimony in the Federal Court in Richmond yesterday was that Brown has had more positive effects in all the other areas of American society except education. This is ironic. It's had much less visible effect in education than in other areas of American





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