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Kenneth ClarkKenneth Clark
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Session:         Page of 763

I think Norman Vincent Peale is a joke. And I saw an ad for a book about Pike-- you know --

Oh well, it's getting absurd. Even the discussion is absurd. In fact, you know, I'm surprised that you haven't asked me, “What isn't?” And frankly, I don't know.

Q:

Let's go back to MARC. You were the one then, do I understand correctly, who decided that MARC would be established outside Harlem, physically located outside of Harlem?

Clark:

And away from any institution. You know, I would not participate in it, if it were part of an academic bureaucratic situation. I wanted it free.

Q:

Did you organize it?

Clark:

Yes, supported by the Field Foundation, and at the end of the first year, substantial grant from the Ford Foundation.

Q:

This is probably in the reports of MARC, but just concisely, what did you conceive originally to be the main thrust of MARC?

Clark:

Well, the best, most succint answer to that came from our first chairman, Ted Kheel. “A poor man's AMA.” We were going to experiment. MARC was from the very beginning, and up to the end, an experiment to determine whether it was possible to use trained, disciplined intelligence as an instrument to effect social policy on behalf of those large segments of the population who had no voice, you know, and who had no power, and who certainly





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