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Mamie ClarkMamie Clark
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Session:         Page of 100

exposure. Then we have a day school, and the day school is part of the services, so I shouldn't seem to make it a separate kind of entity, but this is for children who are even more disturbed than the children coming on an out-patient basis. They cannot be contained in the public schools, and so we offer them a school center, with a very structured, highly educational orientation.

That's what we're all about. We're family-oriented, in the sense that we see the families, and not just the child. Now, parents are constantly involved in the treatment and allaspects of the program.

Q:

Dr. Clark, let's flash back to the beginning. Could you briefly trace how you grew up, with special reference to what influenced you as you grew up to take the course that you have, into psychology and into specifically working with children, and then coming and setting up your work here in Harlem?

Clark:

My, what a big question.

Q:

Let's go back to where you were born, just a little bit --

Clark:

I was born in Hot Springs, Arkansas, in 1917. My father was a physician and my mother was a housewife.

Q:

What were their first names?

Clark:

My father's name was Harold H. Phipps. My mother's name was Katy Florence Phipps.



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