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Mamie ClarkMamie Clark
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Session:         Page of 100

most part. And I think, because I didn't get so much of child psychology or even social, led me almost back to mathematics, so I did a statistical study and worked with Garrett on my dissertation.

Q:

And what was the subject of your dissertation?

Clark:

“The Development of Primary Mental Abilities with Age.”

Q:

What was your main finding in this dissertation?

Clark:

The main finding really was tracing this development, and seeing that those children who were bright in one area tended to be bright in all areas, and they tended to increase in brightness, really. That was the main finding.

Q:

Just what do you mean by increasing brightness ? Do you mean that their IQs actually increased as they --?

Clark:

Well, as you went up the age scale, you would have bright children say at age six, and you had -- I had a group of children from public schools, and the average IQ would be say 100 -- I don't remember exactly what it was -- but that same group of the brightest children, as they went through school, would have an average IQ a little higher. It went up a little bit. And it wasn't the IQ that I was using, it was another scale. I don't even remember the scale. I think it was Goodenoff's scale. But I don't want to prove that.

But the main thing was, the children who were bright in one thing were bright in most things. They really were.



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