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Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Mamie ClarkMamie Clark
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Session:         Page of 100

But they don't know how to take the tests. They really don't.

Q:

What's your opinion of, how does this happen in the public schools here? Is this just a special New York problem here, to your knowledge, or is it broader than that?

Clark:

I think it's broader than that. I don't have much contact with it other than New York City, but certainly I think the whole educational system is breaking down in this country, all over -- from higher education to nursery school. But in New York City, it's absolutely disgraceful. I mean, they just don't teach the children. They really don't care. And they don't think the children can learn. They don't think the children can learn, so they behave as if they don't think the children can learn.

Q:

Now, you also mentioned one of the added services here is medical. When did you decide that you should give a child a complete physical examination?

Clark:

Oh, very early. I think it was in the stage where we were seeing these children who were misplaced in the public schools, because some of them that we had to refer out, they couldn't hear, you know, or they couldn't see well. They didn't have glasses. And not a large proportion of them, but a significant number of children had some kind of physical impairment which was affecting their learning. We had pediatricians, right after the remedial reading teacher we engaged, we had a pediatrician, for that educational purpose, not for the other ailments. But then of course, we began to use the



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