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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

back I think probably not a good idea. Some of them are cruel. 1968 cover of Lyndon Johnson, Man of the Year, with the nose sticking out. But there's a lot of variety. In 1967 it was “Twenty-Five and Under.” That's not a bad notion, I guess. It's amazing--in 1965 Lyndon Johnson was Man of the Year, and he was the most dignified looking, powerful man. In 1968, he appears with a nose like that famous piano player, Jimmy Durante. He looks like Jimmy Durante. So that shows what can happen to one man in just three years.

We did cover the Arts and Humanities Committee and what impact it did have? Yes, we did.

Q:

You mean the president's committee? Yes, we did. Let's stick with TIME now.

Heiskell:

Let me just make a note.

Q:

You can put it in right now, if you have something else to add.

Heiskell:

I figure I'll have to get the document and read it to you. [pause in interview]

Q:

You want to go back to our previous discussion about the president's committee. Go ahead.

Heiskell:

Well, you asked whether we had any effect. I thought I'd just give you a little note. When the tax reforms act first came out and was called, I believe, Treasury One, it was a very radical reform



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