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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Heiskell:

No. What was printed was essentially pro-bomb, but then again that was part of the sweep of history, but what was going on in people's minds was a great big question mark about it. Everybody realized that this meant a new day has arrived and how are we ever going to cope with this new day and began thinking about it right away.

Q:

Mechanically, how did the war censorship work? Would you have to show the dummy of the magazine to somebody in New York? Because you had referred to photos--

Heiskell:

No. The photos were, to the extent that they were censored, they were censored at source. Occasionally, we would ask ourselves whether to check with the authorities or not, which we would do, but there wasn't a censor of sitting in the office--

Q:

In other words, it was self-censorship.

Heiskell:

Yes.

Q:

What were your principal tasks, yours, postwar in those early years?

Heiskell:

In the postwar, of course, what I described earlier instantly reversed itself. The question was, how do we satisfy this pent-up demand? How do we get enough paper? How do we get enough printing capacity? We were working with Charlie Stillman. We



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