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Notable New     Yorkers
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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Heiskell:

It's really more one of the businesses.

Q:

Okay.

Heiskell:

Well, you know, originally we all had dreams about it being a potentially important educational tool, and it may yet be. But as a mass educational tool, it won't, be, because as the systems are improved and more programming can be carried, you also have to recognize the fact that all you're doing is fractionating your audience. When you talk about a system that can carry 108 channels, you're also talking about a system in which the viewer will have great difficulty in finding anything at all! [laughter]. If you give people too many choices, you know, they sort of go blind. In my country house I have supposedly 60 different channels, and I doubt that I even know where 20 of them are.

Q:

Okay. Let's talk about Time Inc. and getting into newspapers. And if I'm not mistaken, the story really begins in the 1960s with the Newark Evening News. So why won't you start there? If that's correct.

Heiskell:

Oh, I guess it started even earlier than that. I think Harry Luce always had a dream about owning a newspaper somewhere or the other. And I can hardly remember any time when there wasn't talk about a newspaper, owning a newspaper. The Star, about which we will talk later, we first approached them--I don't know, 15, 20 years before we actually acquired it. And at that point The Star was owned



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