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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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Part:         Session:         Page of 1143

Q:

And was Gosden interested in medicine?

Lasker:

No, but he was a friend of Stein's and he made the appointment in August or late July. They saw him out in Newport in the summer of 1960 and felt that they had had a moderately successful talk with him. In any case, he did not veto the figure, nor did the present put any reserve of any consequence on it later. The Budget would often put a reserve on the figures and not allow all the money that was voted to be spent, and there probably was a small reserve but it wasn't a crippling one.

Eisenhower, in his whole administration of eight years, never gave any encouragement to medical research personally. He was always on the verge of vetoing or withholding funds from the NIH. Such a strange position for someone who had benefitted so much from medical research entirely at Federal expense!

Q:

Is he known to have expressed himself in that area? He was the beneficiary of very modern research.

Lasker:

He was the beneficiary of research in anticoagulants and of advances in surgery, but he always felt that somehow or other government participation in research or government participation in anything but defense matters was wrong, that Federal money was somehow to be looked down upon. A very curious attitude for someone who was President of the United States and who had gotten his education from and spent his entire employment



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