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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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that their behavior became neurotic as a result, very often. And as there were a number of diseases for which there were no known chemical cures then, I was interested in the idea that certain kinds of stress in certain types of people brought on a specific type of reaction, such as stomach ulcers, and I was interested in the effort of the Institute of Psychoanalysis to study these problems in Chicago.

I met Alexander around 1937 or '38 and became a member of the Board of the Institute for Psychoanalysis in about '39 or '40. This Institute in Chicago was the first important organized effort to train analysis and to do research along Freudian lines without being completely limited by Freudian theories. Mrs. Max Ascoli, a daughter of Julius Rosenwald, started and supported it with great vision for many years. Albert and I contributed to a study in '41 and '42 on how psychoanalytic techniques might be applied more widely and be available to more people. This, of course, is the bottleneck in psychoanalysis because the number of analysts trained was then only 200 and I think there might be only a thousand as of 1963. And the expense is enormous and the investment of time is enormous.

Q:

Did Mr. Lasker have a natural interest in this field, or was it through you?

Lasker:

I got him interested in the field and I got him to go to an analyst in New York before we were married, and he was



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