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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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enthusiastic about the idea. But it looks to me as if we haven't got the right English-American combination to really make anything happen yet.

Q:

What about the French situation? Has this progressed?

Lasker:

It's progressed. They've had very good meetings. They're working on cooperative efforts, and it's been very useful, and there's no reason it shouldn't in England, but if you don't have the right people wanting to do it, it doesn't click.

Q:

What about the Russian cooperation?

Lasker:

Well, the Russian thing has gone on and on, and of course the Russians have no large numbers of drugs. They have one drug that's only moderately good, not as good as many drugs that we have evidently, but they get exchanges of drugs from us. It's extremely difficult to read their papers, and they're in the business of having to have interpreters all the time. It was really a political ploy of Nixon's to send -- to have cooperation with Russia on that level, and as far as I can tell, nothing great has come out of it. Maybe the Russians have gotten some help, but certainly we haven't got any advantage, either in heart or in cancer.

Q:

You also told me about two Italian doctors.



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