Be sure to check back regularly for information on our upcoming events!


New Events Brought to you by the Ukrainian Students Society:

******************ATTENTION EVERYONE!!!***********************

Are you interested in being part of a culture club?
Want to get more involved on campus?
Your resume looks pretty empty?
Or you just like Ukrainian food?

If you answered YES to ANY of the above questions, then you should come to the
UKRAINIAN STUDENT SOCIETY ELECTIONS ON APRIL 3rd, from
8- 9:00 pm in HAMILTON 315. All of the board positions are up for grabs!
If you have any questions about the positions, please contact either
Dmytro ( dk2204@columbia.edu) or the board member with that
position to have them explain what they do.
It is a great experience and a good opportunity for a
leadership role (plus it is great on the resume!)

Hope to see you all there!

P.S. Don't forget to purchase your OKEAN ELZY TICKETS!

http://www.russianny.com/NewDesign/TicketTemp/Current//
index_tickettemp.asp?ACTION=TICKETTEMP&ARTNUM=1142966160


Study in L'viv: May 22 - June 30, 2006
"Ukrainian Through Its Living Culture"

Home | Study in Lviv: FAQ |
The Ukrainian Language and Literature Program at the UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
is pleased to announce the sixth annual travel-study course in L'viv,
Ukraine
Note: This course is open to anyone interested.
This is an intensive course designed to enhance practical language
skills through a direct experience of current life in Ukraine. The
course employs contemporary popular culture and media, taking maximum
advantage of the urban L'viv environment to expand vocabulary and
comprehension. All instruction is in Ukrainian.
Prerequisite: UKR 212 or equivalent level of proficiency
(intermediate). Note: Students with advanced knowledge of Ukrainian
who are interested in this travel study program may test their
proficiency by contacting the instructor, Dr Alla Nedashkivska.

Individuals who do not attend any institution or institutions other
than the University of Alberta
should apply for admission to Open Studies before contacting the
Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies for registration.
Call Open Studies: (780) 492-3113.
To reserve a place in this course, students are urged to register by
e-mail with the department office (200 Arts Building) as early as
possible. No deposit is required.

MLCS Administrative Contact:
Marina Menze, Undergraduate Secretary
Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies
200 Arts Building
University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB Canada T6G 2E6

Tel. 780-492-3272 Fax 780-492-9106.
Marina Menze <mmenze@maildrop.srv.ualberta.ca>
MLCS Academic Contact:
Dr Alla Nedashkivska: Office (780) 492-6800
e-mail: alla.nedashkivska@ualberta.ca

437-D, Arts
Edmonton, Alberta
Canada, T6G 2E6

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT:
http://www.arts.ualberta.ca/~ukraina/LvivCourse.html

 

HI everyone!
Hope you are getting through the rough week of midterms and papers,
holding the image of Spring Break in the back of your mind. good luck!

Check out various activities brought to you by the Ukrainian Students
Society and mark them in your calendars!!!

1) Ukrainian Club Soccer
April 7 - 8

2) Ukrainian Student Society Meeting this Tuesday, March 7th
When: 8:00-9:30 PM
Where: Hamilton 306

3)Ukrainian Merchandise now for sale!!!!!!!!!!

4) Ukrainian Concert Coming Up!!!
Pikkadirska Terchiya
When: Friday March 24 at 7 PM
Where: Hall of Ukrainian National Home

5) Ukrainian Film Club Event
When: Thursday, March 23 7:30 PM

6) “WHAT CAN BE EXPECTED FROM THE MARCH 2006 PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS IN
UKRAINE?” Discussion series
When:Tuesday, March 7, 2006 from 7:00-9:00pm (TOMORROW)
Where: Room 1512, International Affairs Building, Columbia University,
420 W. 118th Street, New York, NY

7) Also, check out the greatest Web site ever!
onlyinukraine.blogspot.com

 

Event Details:

1.) Ukrainian Club Soccer!!!!

The Society of International Undergraduates is putting together a
world cup competition and we as team Ukraine will be playing.... All
interestd in playing need to mail me at ukrainian.columbia@gmail.com by
March 9 in order to be on the roster. It will be a great time. No
experience necessary (since it's natural.. you're Ukrainian!) Hope you can
make it... details for the tournament are below.

April 7 - 8: THE TOURNAMENT
9-12 players (it'll be 9 on sides unless there are any objections.
You can play with as few as 7 to your own disadvantage.)
NOTE* you don't have to be from the nation you are representing!...
ps... that means if you know of anyone who is REALLY REALLY GOOD...
possibly they might want to be Ukrainian for a day.... hmmmm

2.) Ukrainian Student Society Meeting this Tuesday.

We will be discussing general club happening. It will be a nice
study break so please come.

Date Start End Room (Hamilton)
Status
-----------------------------------------------------------------
3/7/2006 8:00 PM 9:30 PM 306
3/21/2006 8:00 PM 9:30 PM 313
4/3/2006 8:00 PM 9:30 PM 315
4/19/2006 8:00 PM 9:30 PM 317
5/1/2006 8:00 PM 9:30 PM 317

 

3.)Ukrainian Merchandise now for sale!!!!!!!!!!

Check it out... You can buy it online and have it delivered right to
you!!!!
www.cafepress.com/ukrss

4.) Ukrainian Concert Coming Up!!!

Pikkadirska Terchiya
Friday March 24 at 7 PM
Hall of Ukrainian National Home
140 Second Avenue
New York, NY 10003
216-240-4997

Info on the group
http://www.tertsia.info/

The club might be able to get tickets for the show so we could all go
for free.... Please let us know if you are interested in going.

5.) Ukrainian Film Club Event
Thursday, March 23, 2006, at 7:30 PM
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/ufc/pages/home.htm

6)“WHAT CAN BE EXPECTED FROM THE MARCH 2006 PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS IN
UKRAINE?” Discussion series

The Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University,
in coordination with the Brooklyn Ukrainian Group, Shevchenko Scientific
Society, and the Ukrainian Congress Committee of America,
invite you to the next event in the “Race for the Rada” discussion series,
titled:

“WHAT CAN BE EXPECTED FROM THE MARCH 2006 PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS IN
UKRAINE?”

On March 26, 2006, elections to Ukraine’s parliament, the Verkhovna
Rada, will take place. These elections are being watched particularly
closely because, after March, many of the powers now held by the
presidency will be transferred to parliament, which will elect the prime
minister. Since the Orange Revolution, we have seen Ukrainian President
Viktor Yushchenko of the “Our Ukraine” bloc dismiss the prime minister,
Yuliya Tymoshenko, who then re-energized her bloc and started her bid to
win the parliamentary elections, making it clear that she wants the post
back. . . . Can the many battling parties successfully form a majority
coalition in parliament? . . . Should we expect repeat parliamentary
elections soon? . . .

Participating in the discussion will be panelists:

* Robert Legvold, Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Political Science at
Columbia University, who will focus on the elections’ place in the
evolution of Ukrainian politics since the Orange Revolution and their
implications for the future, particularly on Ukraine’s shifting
relationship with Russia;

* John Gillingham III, Professor of History at University of
Missouri-St. Louis and Senior Visiting Scholar at the Harvard Ukrainian
Research Institute, who will focus on the elections as they relate to
Ukraine’s relations with the European Union;

* Mykola Riabchuk, Research Associate at the Center for European Studies
at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy and Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar at Columbia
University, who will focus on Ukraine’s internal regional divisions,
identities, and political culture with regard to the elections.

Moderated by Frank Sysyn, Professor of History at the University of
Alberta (Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies) and Petro Jacyk
Visiting Scholar at Columbia University.

When: Tuesday, March 7, 2006 from 7:00-9:00pm
Where: Room 1512, International Affairs Building, Columbia University,
420 W. 118th Street, New York, NY

********************

NEXT WEEK:

The Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University continues its new
thematic series: “Ukraine. A Cinematographic View from the West”. The
Club's March event will present two perspectives on the Orange
Revolution, the November 2004 peaceful mass mobilization of Ukrainians
in defense of their right to vote. A Ukrainian and an American filmmaker
will give their individual accounts of what happened on and around the
Maidan (the Independence Square) in Kyiv, Ukraine. The program is titled:

"THE ORANGE REVOLUTION. A STORY FULL OF SOUND AND FURY, SIGNIFYING?"

The March event will include three films:

“NEVSEREMOS. People from Maidan”, 2005 director Serhiy Masloboyshchykov,
Ukraine, American premier. The film documents two opposing political
perspectives – the orange, pro-Yushchenko and the blue pro-Yanukovych -
during the heady events and nine months after.

“Zlydni” (Poverty), 2005, director Stepan Koval, Ukraine, American
Premier. This short plasticene animation is a tongue-in-cheek metaphor
for the “blessing” that Russia has been for Ukraine as a neighbor.

“Borderland, Ukraine and the Rebirth of Democracy,” 2005, director Paul
Tremblay, USA. A historical background of the Orange Revolution is
combined with a detailed analysis of the events by their participants
and observers, who come from varied linguistic, cultural, and political
backgrounds.

Introduction and post screening discussion led by Yuri Shevchuk,
director of the Film Club.

WHEN: Thursday, March 23, 2006, at 7:30 PM
WHERE: 614 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

All films are either with English subtitles or in English.

This event is co-sponsored by the Ukrainian Students’ Society of
Columbia University.

********************

IN TWO WEEKS:

The Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University will host Dr. Anna
Procyk, who will give a lecture titled:

"YOUNG EUROPE IN UKRAINE"

The similarities between the ideological foundations of Young Europe and
the guiding ideals of the Brotherhood of St. Cyril and Methodius have
intrigued a number of students interested in the intellectual history of
Ukraine. In recent decades, however, few authors have ventured to place
these similarities under a serious scholarly scrutiny. This
presentation will explore the various channels through which political
ideas formulated in the revolutionary conclaves of Western Europe have
reached Ukrainian students and educators in Lviv, Kharkiv and Kyiv. The
presentation will conclude with a discussion of the impact of Young
Europe's political program on modern Ukrainian nationalism.

Two recent articles by Anna Procyk are suggested for background reading:
"Polish Émigrés as Emissaries of the Risorgimento in Eastern Europe"
Harvard Ukrainian Studies XXV (2/2 2001: 7-29); "Giuseppe Mazzini and
Eastern Europe," Ad Fontes: Studia in honorem Oleh Kupchysnkyj
septuagenario dedicata Kyiv-Lviv, 2004.

Anna Procyk, Associate Professor, KBCC, City University of New York;
author of "Russian Nationalism and Ukraine during the Revolution and the
Civil War." She holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and is an alumna
of the Harriman Institute.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 22 at 12:00 noon
WHERE: Room 1219, International Affairs Building, Columbia University,
420 W. 118th St.

ATTENTION!!!

The February 2006 event of the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia
University will feature something entirely different -- for the first
time, the Film Club will screen films made about Ukraine in other
countries. This is meant to be an invitation for the viewers to take
a look at Ukraine and Ukrainian heritage through the eyes of a
Westerner. The event will be the first installment of an on-going
program entitled "Ukraine"

A Cinematic View From the West.

The New York film-maker Andrea Odezynska will present her two films
and engage the audience in a post-screening discussion.

The program includes: “The Whisperer,”2005, a documentary about
little-known folk rituals of the Carpathian highlands that will
seriously test the viewer’s capacity to believe in the unbelievable.

“Dora Was Dysfunctional,” 1994, a hilarious story of a young American
caught in between two cultures - American and Ukrainian, and looking
for love in all the wrong places. This romantic comedy was short-
listed at the Academy Awards, the Hampton Film Festival and the
Rotterdam Film Festival. It has been screened on HBO and Showtime.

When: February 16, 2006, Thursday, 7:30 PM

Where: 717 Hamilton Hall, Columbia University.

Hope to see you all there!

 

Hey All!

Welcome back again!!!

Hope you all had a good break and ready for this final push to the summer.

We will be having our first meeting this Monday January 30th 7-8pm in
Lerner Ramp Lounge East.

We will be discussing the upcoming semester, what events we will be
having, when the meetings will take place, events with other Ukrainian
clubs, language nights and much more. We want to hear your input so we can
better accomodate to your needs!

We will also discuss our clothing ideas and will have merchandise for you
shortly!

See you all there!!!

 

ps... tea and home baked goods will be served!

 

HI everyone!
Have any plans for this Thursday? Want to relax, sit back, and watch an
interesting movie ? If your answer is YES, then come to the Ukrainian Film
Club this THURSDAY, January 26th 7:30 PM.
Location: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University Campus.

The Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University will resume its
2005-2006 season by presenting US premier of the critically acclaimed
award-winning documentary film

“A Dangerously Free Person”, director Roman Shyrman

The event will also screen a short feature film

“Once Upon a Time”, director Serhiy Krutin

Roman Shyrman’s documentary “A Dangerously Free Person” (2004, 52
min.) is dedicated to the legendary Sergey Paradzhanov, director of
“Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors” and the most prominent
representative of the Ukrainian poetic cinema of the 1960's.
Paradzhanov’s work and controversial personality inspired generations
of free-thinking filmmakers as well as intellectuals in Ukraine and
elsewhere, many of whom went on to take part in the human rights and
national liberation movement that contributed to the eventual
collapse of the Soviet empire and the emergence of an independent
Ukraine in 1991. Federico Fellini famously called Paradzhanov a
“magician of cinema”.

True to its goal of showcasing the new cinema talent, the Club’s
event will open with the short feature “Once Upon a Time”, 2004, 8
min., directed by Serhiy Krutin. Today, Mr. Krutin is often mentioned
as one of the most promising young Ukrainian filmmakers.

In his opening remarks, Yuri Shevchuk, director of the Ukrainian Film
Club of Columbia University, will give an introduction about the two
filmmakers and speak about the highlights of the cinematographic year
2005 in Ukraine. The film program will be followed by a Q-and-A
period and a general discussion.

When: January 26, 2006, Thursday, 7:30 PM.
Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University Campus.

Both films are in the original Ukrainian version with English
subtitles. Free admission.

 

 

Welcome back everyone!

Hope your winter vacation was fun and restful!
Here are the upcoming events that are being brought to you by the
Ukrainian Students Society:

1)Ukrainian Film Club Event
When: January 26, 2006, Thursday, 7:30 PM.
Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University Campus.

2)Music of Kyiv and New York
When: Sunday, 22 January, 3 p.m.
Where: Ukrainian Institute of America
2 East 79th Street
New York, NY 10021

3)COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OFFERS UKRAINIAN COURSES IN SPRING 2006

4) Meet the Author at the New York City Book Launch of “Wormwood
Forest: A Natural History of Chernobyl.”
When:Tuesday, January 24, 2006 – 7PM
Where: The Ukrainian Museum
222 East 6th Street (between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York City

Detailed Information about each of the events listed above:
___________________________________________________________________________
1) Next Ukrainian Film Club Event

The Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University will resume its
2005-2006 season by presenting US premier of the critically acclaimed
award-winning documentary film

“A Dangerously Free Person”, director Roman Shyrman

The event will also screen a short feature film

“Once Upon a Time”, director Serhiy Krutin

Roman Shyrman’s documentary “A Dangerously Free Person” (2004, 52
min.) is dedicated to the legendary Sergey Paradzhanov, director of
“Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors” and the most prominent
representative of the Ukrainian poetic cinema of the 1960's.
Paradzhanov’s work and controversial personality inspired generations
of free-thinking filmmakers as well as intellectuals in Ukraine and
elsewhere, many of whom went on to take part in the human rights and
national liberation movement that contributed to the eventual
collapse of the Soviet empire and the emergence of an independent
Ukraine in 1991. Federico Fellini famously called Paradzhanov a
“magician of cinema”.

True to its goal of showcasing the new cinema talent, the Club’s
event will open with the short feature “Once Upon a Time”, 2004, 8
min., directed by Serhiy Krutin. Today, Mr. Krutin is often mentioned
as one of the most promising young Ukrainian filmmakers.

In his opening remarks, Yuri Shevchuk, director of the Ukrainian Film
Club of Columbia University, will give an introduction about the two
filmmakers and speak about the highlights of the cinematographic year
2005 in Ukraine. The film program will be followed by a Q-and-A
period and a general discussion.

When: January 26, 2006, Thursday, 7:30 PM.
Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University Campus.

Both films are in the original Ukrainian version with English
subtitles. Free admission.

__________________________________________________________________________

2) Music of Kyiv and New York

The “Music at the Institute” music series sponsored by the Ukrainian
Institute of America will present a concert of works as part of its
“Anthology of Ukrainian and American Chamber Music.” The program,
entitled “Two Cities, One Spirit – Music of Kyiv and New York,” will
be performed by the Musiciens sans frontières ensemble under the
direction of George Stelluto, one of the most promising young
conductors of his generation.

The program consists of the World Premiere (String Version) of Huang
Ruo’s “Leaving Sao” (2006), written for the Ukrainian Institute of
America and Musiciens sans frontières; the American premiere of
Symphony No. 3 (1978) by one of Ukraine’s leading composers, Ivan
Karabyts; “Rounds” (1944) by David Diamond; and Symphony No. 5 (1943)
by William Schuman.

Tickets: $30, UIA members and Senior Citizens -- $25, Students -- $20

A reception will follow the concert.

For additional information and reservations, please call (212)
288-8660 or visit www.ukrainianinstitute.org

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

Still in his 20s, Chinese composer HUANG RUO is already known to the
music worlds of two continents as a promising young composer and
scholar. His music has been performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra
under Wolfgang Sawallisch, the American Composers Orchestra under
Dennis Russell Davies, the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, Chicago Pro
Musica, the Nieuw Ensemble of Amsterdam, and the Queens Symphony with
Cho-Liang Lin, to name but a few. In 2003, Huang Ruo was featured on
the composer’s portrait concert at Columbia University’s Miller
Theater, where all his four chamber concertos were premiered as a
cycle by the International Contemporary Ensemble. New York Times
critic Allan Kozinn named this concert number two of the “Top Ten
Classical Moments of 2003.” Hailed by the Wall Street Journal as
“strikingly assured, marked by a descriptive grandeur and gravity,”
Huang Ruo has also been honored with multiple ASCAP Young Composer
Awards. The orchestral lyric “Leaving Sao”(“Sao” is Chinese for
“sorrow” or “sadness”) was first written in 2004. The string version
of this work, written for the Ukrainian Institute of America and the
Musiciens sans frontières ensemble, will receive its world premiere
at this concert.

Ukrainian composer IVAN KARABYTS (1945-2002) is the author of a large
body of symphonic, chamber, vocal, and stage works. Contemporary in
spirit and expression, his music reflects his endeavor to convey the
universality of experience, both past and present, be it that of
Ukraine and her people or of humanity at large. Following in the
tradition of Mahler, Shostakovich, and Lyatoshynsky, Karabyts makes
use of vivid images that often take him beyond harmonious form. His
symphonic works have won critical acclaim for such qualities as
grandeur of scale, conceptual vividness, and brilliant command of the
orchestra and its coloristic potential. The works of Ivan Karabyts
are frequently performed throughout the countries of the former
Soviet Union, and many of his compositions have been heard by
audiences in Germany, Finland, Italy, Argentina, England, and the
United States.

In his Symphony No. 3, written in a single movement for strings,
Karabyts uses the various colors of the string orchestra with
emphasis on deep expressivity and research of harmonic and voice
intensity rather than virtuosity and brilliance. One of the
composer’s most important works, which has been regularly performed
by chamber orchestras in Ukraine and Europe, it will receive its
first American performance at this concert.

DAVID DIAMOND (1913-2005), one of the leading American composers of
the 20th century, was once described by Leonard Bernstein as “a vital
branch in the stream of American music.” His many works include 11
symphonies, ten string quartets, art songs, choral music, solo pieces
for piano and string instruments, sonatas, and more. Diamond At a
time when electronic and aleatoric music swept up so many composers,
Diamond continued to pursue, refine, and expand his own chromatic and
contrapuntal techniques fully within 20th century harmonic and
stylistic contexts, rejecting the notion of chance elements in his
work. In an interview with the Seattle Times shortly before his
death, he said, “I have always thought music had to have strong
melodic contours, good rhythmic variety and counterpoint, or it would
make no dent on people…”

Diamond wrote “Rounds for String Orchestra,” perhaps his most popular
work and the winner of the New York Music Critics Award in 1944, on
commission from Dimitri Mitropolous and the Minneapolis Symphony, who
asked the composer for “a happy work,” according to Bob Massey’s
program notes for a recent performance of the piece at the Kennedy
Center. The result was pronounced by New York Times critic Olin
Downes to be “admirably fashioned, joyous and vernal… there is
laughter in the music. And no waste notes!” And reviewer Robert
Cummings, describes it as “a short, mostly energetic work for
strings, which effervesces with such infectious optimism, you’re
totally enamored of its charm before the manic four-minute-plus first
movement is even half-over. The following Adagio is absolutely
lovely, and the finale is a vivacious romp that leaves you breathless
but exhilarated.”

WILLIAM SCHUMAN (1910-1992), a native New Yorker, wrote a plethora of
works in virtually every musical genre, each mirroring his strong
personality in their sharply defined sense of structure, line, and
dynamism. He incorporated American jazz and folk traditions into
works that ranged from a harmonically conservative early style to
later excursions into dissonance and polytonality. Schumann was also
a vital force in American musical life as an administrator. In the
course of his career he served as director of publications for G.
Schirmer, Inc., president of the Juilliard School, the first
president of Lincoln Center, and held numerous positions with a host
of other organizations. It was under his aegis as Juilliard’s
president that the world-renowned Juilliard Quartet was formed. He
guided the growth of Lincoln Center, establishing both the Chamber
Music Society and the Film Society of Lincoln Center. His numerous
awards, honors, and prizes include the first Pulitzer Prize in music
in 1943 for his cantata “A Free Song” and the National Medal of Arts
in 1987. In presenting Schuman with the MacDowell Colony Medal in
1971, Aaron Copland said: “…In Schuman’s pieces you have the feeling
that only an American could have written them… You hear it in his
orchestration, which is full of snap and brilliance. You hear it in
the kind of American optimism which is at the basis of his music.”

American conductor GEORGE STELLUTO is quickly becoming known for his
engaging, energetic performances and insightful interpretations of
music from the Baroque to the present day. His recent success has
identified him as one of the most promising young conductors of his
generation. 2005 marks his sixth year as Music Director of the Las
Vegas Music Festival, his third as Artistic Advisor to the Chernihiv
Winter Festival in Ukraine, and his first as Music Director of
Musiciens sans frontieres. Additionally, he is currently Music
Director of the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Symphony
Orchestra and the UNLV Opera Theater. In 2004, he became the first
conductor ever invited to join The Juilliard School’s prestigious
Artist Diploma Program – studying with and serving as assistant to
James DePreist and often working with the school’s orchestras,
ensembles, and the Vocal Arts Department.

George Stelluto’s 2005-2006 conducting engagements include
appearances at The Juilliard School and Symphony Space in New York,
in France’s Loire Valley, and with the Las Vegas Music Festival and
UNLV Symphony Orchestra. Last season, George Stelluto made debut
appearances with the International Contemporary Ensemble and the Kyiv
Chamber Orchestra. Recent past engagements include appearances with
the Ukrainian National Orchestra, the Transylvania State Philharmonic
(Romania), Kyiv Philharmonic, the Wieniawski String Orchestra of
Poland, the Hartford Symphony Orchestra, and the Nevada Symphony
Orchestra, as well as tour appearances in London, Cambridge,
Edinburgh, and Glasgow. In 2000, he made his international debut at
the Kyiv International Music Festival with an acclaimed performance
of Samuel Barber's Second Essay – a first for Kyiv audiences. Since
then he has returned regularly, receiving enthusiastic responses for
the Ukrainian premieres of works by William Schuman (Symphony No. 5),
Samuel Barber (First Essay), Virko Baley (Adam’s Apple), and Eric
Ewazen (Chamber Symphony). He has premiered the works of numerous
other composers, including Huang Ruo, Kati Agocs, Fisher Tull,
Carolyn Yarnell, Elena Roussanova, and Derek Bourgeois. George
Stelluto has collaborated with such noted artists as Hilary Hahn,
Edgar Meyer, Samuel Ramey, Frank Huang, Brinton Smith, and Jane
Dutton among others. His performances, interviews, and recordings
have been broadcast on radio and television throughout the United
States and Eastern Europe. His festival credits include the Aspen
Music Festival, Peter Britt Festival, and The Quartet Program.
___________________________________________________________________________

3) UKRAINIAN CLASSES OFFERED AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

INGUISTICS W4800 section 001 Call # 66152, 4 Points

SPRING 2006

LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY: POWER, IDEOLOGY, IDENTITY

Instructor: Antonina Berezovenko
Thursday 4:10pm-6:00pm 501 International Affairs Building

The course will focus on features of language development that
reflect and contribute to the development of society at large—the
phenomena that can be viewed as the incarnation of social changes
in language. It will examine language as a unique tool of
political and ideological control, a key factor in shaping
identities, and a reflection of changing power relations.

Language, Culture, and Identity Issues in Contemporary Ukraine
By Mykola Riabchuk, visiting lecturer, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla
Academy”

Ukraine, a nation of about 50 million people, is one of the largest
in Europe. In 2004, Ukrainians carried out a peaceful democratic
revolution that drew the attention of the whole world and evoked a
broad interest in Ukraine’s political and economic prospects. One can
barely grasp, however, Ukraine’s trajectory, either future or past,
without a comprehensive outlook on some of its key peculiarities that
make the Ukrainian case extremely interesting from both a theoretical
and practical point of view. Actually, the development of the whole
of Eastern Europe and, specifically, of Russia can hardly be
understood without its crucial Ukrainian component.
Ukraine, as a nation located on the border between two different
civilizations, Eurasian and European, and exposed to various cultural
and political influences throughout its history, provides students of
the region with a great many paradoxes that often look like
ambivalence, if not ambiguity. Language, culture, and identity issues
contribute greatly to Ukraine’s paradoxes and controversies but,
also, to the nation’s uniqueness and potential dynamic. All these
issues would be analyzed in the proposed course from a cultural-
anthropological perspective, within the context of post-Soviet
transition and the processes of de-communization, de-colonization,
‘delayed’ nation building, and re-adoption of liberal-democratic
ideas of multiculturalism and multilingualism in traditionally non-
liberal and not-so-democratic-yet environment.
The course would employ an interdisciplinary approach that combines
the analysis of sociological data that portray contemporary Ukrainian
society; ongoing discussions on language, culture, and identity
issues in post-Soviet Ukraine; correlation between people’s attitude
to these issues and broader patterns of their civic and political
behavior; theoretical insights into problems of identity,
multiculturalism and multilingualism; and a comparative outlook on
these issues in some other countries, specifically in Russia and the
EU. Versatile methods from transitology, political science,
sociology, cultural history and anthropology, studies on nationalism
and post-colonialism, and critical discourse analysis would be
introduced to the students in a course of interactive discussions.
The course would consist of 15 seminars (30 hours) and would be
credited on the base of attendance/participation (15%), a mid-term
exam (15%), a final exam (30%) and a research paper (40%).

Syllabus

Week 1
Introduction. Description of the course. Requirements. Suggested
literature.
General information about Ukraine. Country of many paradoxes.

Week 2
Ukrainian Identity between West and East.
Building blocks of national identity. Primordialists vs constructivists.
‘Staatnation’ and ‘Kulturnation’. The role of intelligentsia in the
‘Age of Nationalism’.
Three stages of making the modern nation.

Week 3
Ukrainians in the Russian and Austrian-Hungarian empires: delayed and
advanced nation-building. ‘Little Russian’ identity. Acculturation or
Russification?
Discussions about colonialism.

Week 4
Ukraine as a ‘Kulturnation’: emancipation from the Empire.
Ukrainian language among the Slavonic languages. ‘Discovery’ of the
vernacular.
Ukrainian modernism as a vehicle of cultural emancipation.
The Nativist-Westernizer Controversy.

Week 5
Language and culture politics in the Soviet Union.
‘Affirmative action empire’ or a mass-grave of nations?
Soviet edition of “Little Russianism’. Resistance and collaboration.

Week 6
Culture and language issues during perestroika: from opportunism to
radicalism.
Creative unions and cultural periodicals: institutionalizing the
opposition.
Law on Languages (1989): the beginning of ambiguity.

Week 7
Colonial legacy in post-Soviet Ukraine: major controversies and
discussions.
Traumatic experience of colonial subjugation: inferiority complexes,
hyper-negative/hyper-positive auto-stereotypes.
Two Ukrainian identities: ‘aboriginal’ vs ‘creole’. Urban ‘whites’ vs
rural ‘blacks’.
Duplicity in minority/majority issue.

Week 8
Mid-term exam.

Week 9
Language and culture policy in post-Soviet Ukraine: laissez faire or
affirmative action?
Attempts on state protectionism: education, administration, ‘high’
culture.
Reign of free market: mass culture.
Russian cultural presence: “in bed with an elephant”.

Week 10
Postcolonial features of contemporary Ukrainian culture: ‘inner
freedom’ vs ‘sieged consciousness’.
Advance of postmodernism. New life of ‘surzhyk’.
Intellectuals vs intelligentsia. Literary debates.
Search for new ‘centers’ and revision of ‘peripheries’.

Week 11
Language and media. Advertisement.
Post-communist ‘newspeak’. Critical analysis of the dominant discourse.

Week 12
Gender, language, and power relations.

Week 13
Social ambivalence as both inherited and invented phenomenon.
Language, culture, and identity issues as a source of political
ambiguity and a tool of oligarchic manipulation. Playing with ‘two
Ukraines’.

Week 14
“Divided we stand”: correlations between cultural, linguistic,
ethnic, and political allegiances of Ukrainians, 1990–2006.
Regionalism and multiculturalism – assets or liability?
Debates about the European Charter of the Minority and Regional
Languages.

Week 15
Final exam

Literature:

(a) Books, selected fragments

Orest Subtelny, Ukraine. A History. Toronto, 1987; and subsequent
editions.
Myroslav Shkandrij, Russia and Ukraine. Literature and the Discourse
of Empire from Napoleonic to Postcolonial Times. Montreal: McGill-
Queen's University Press, 2001.
Ralph Lindheim and George Luckyj (eds.), Towards an Intellectual
History of Ukraine. An Anthology of Ukrainian Thought from 1710 to
1995. Toronto, 1996.

(b) Articles

Laada Bilaniuk, “Gender, language attitudes, and language status in
Ukraine,” Language in Society, no. 32, 2003.
Laada Bilaniuk, “A typology of ‘surzhyk’: mixed Ukrainian-Russian
language,” International Journal of Bilingualism, no. 1, 2004.
Anna Fournier, “Mapping Identities: Russian Resistance to Linguistic
Ukrainisation in Central and Eastern Ukraine,” Europe-Asia Studies,
no. 3, 2002.
Oksana Grabowicz, "The Legacy of Colonialism and Communism,”
Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine, vol. 2, no. 2 (March-April 1995).
Oleksandr Hrytsenko, “Culture as a Nation-Building Tool in
Contemporary Ukraine,” Journal of Ukrainian Studies, vol. 26, nos. 1–
2 (2001).
Volodymyr Kulyk, “Normalisation of Ambivalence: The 'Centrist'
Discourse and the Politics of Language and Ethnicity in Kuchma's
Ukraine,” Paper presented at a special convention of the Association
for the Study of Nationalities. Warsaw, 18–21 July 2004.
Marko Pavlyshyn, “Post-Colonial Features in Contemporary Ukrainian
Culture,” Australian Slavic and East European Studies, vol. 6, no. 2
(1992).
Mykola Riabchuk, “Ambiguous 'Borderland': Ukrainian Identity on the
Crossroads of West and East,” www.omp.org.pl/riabchuk.htm
Mykola Riabchuk, Another Battlefield. Russia's Cultural Influence in
the "Near Abroad": The Ukrainian Case. IWM Working Papers, no. 4.
Wien: Institut fuer die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, 2001. 32 p.
http://www.iwm.at/p-iwmwp.htm#Ryabchuk
Mykola Riabchuk, “Culture and Cultural Politics in Ukraine: A Post-
Colonial Perspective,” in Taras Kuzio and Paul D’Anieri (eds.),
Dilemmas of State-Led Nation Building in Ukraine (London: Praeger,
2002).
Stephen Shulman, “National Identity and Public Support for Political
and Economic Reform in Ukraine,” Paper presented at the 9-th Annual
World Convention of the Association for the Study of Nationalities.
New York, 15–17 April 2004.
Maksym Strikha, “Language and Language Policy in Ukraine,” Journal of
Ukrainian Studies, vol. 26, nos. 1–2 (2001).
Andrew Wilson, “Elements of a theory of Ukrainian ethno-national
identities,” Nations and Nationalism, vol. 8, no. 1 (2002).

Additional (optional) reading:

Dominique Arel, “The ‘Orange Revolution’: Analysis and Implications
of the 2004 Presidential Election in Ukraine.” Third Annual Stasiuk
Lecture. Cambridge University, 25 February 2005; http://
www.ukrainianstudies.uottawa.ca/pdf/Arel_Cambridge.pdf
Dominique Arel and Valeri Khmelko, “The Russian factor and
territorial polarization in Ukraine”, The Harriman Review, vol. 9,
nos. 1-2 (Spring 1996).
Ian Bremer, "The Politics of Ethnicity: Russians in the New Ukraine,"
Europe-Asia Studies, vol. 46, no. 2 (1994).
Vitaly Chernetsky, “Postcolonialism, Russia and Ukraine,” Ulbandus:
The Slavic Review of Columbia University, no. 7, 2003;
www.columbia.edu/cu/slavic/ulbandus/toc.htm
Oleh Ilnytzkyj, “Modelling Culture in the Empire: Ukrainian Modernism
and the Death of the All-Russian Idea,” in Andreas Kappeler et al.
(eds.), Culture, Nation, and Identity. Edmonton, 2003.
Jan Germen Janmaat, Nation-Building in Post-Soviet Ukraine.
Educational Policy and the Response of the Russian-Speaking
Population. Amsterdam, 2000.
Andreas Kappeler, “Mazepintsy, Malorossy, Khokhly: Ukrainians in the
Ethnic Hierarchy of the Russian Empire,” in Andreas Kappeler et al.
(eds.), Culture, Nation, and Identity. Edmonton, 2003.
Volodymyr Kulyk, "The Search for Post-Soviet Identities in Ukraine
and Russia and Its Impact on Relations between the Two States," The
Harriman Review, vol. 9, nos. 1-2 (1996).
Oksana Malanchuk, "Social Identification versus Regionalism in
Contemporary Ukraine," Nationalities Papers, Vol. 33, No. 3
(September 2005).
Alexander Motyl, Will the Non-Russians Rebel? Ithaca, NY: Cornell
University Press, 1987.
Natalia Panina, Evhen Golovakha, Tendencies in the Development of
Ukrainian Society (1994-1998). Sociological Indicators. Kyiv, 1999.
Mykola Riabchuk, “The Nativist/Westernizer Controversy in Ukraine:
The End or the Beginning?” Journal of Ukrainian Studies, vol. 21, nos.
1-2 (Summer-Winter 1996).

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY OFFERS UKRAINIAN COURSES IN SPRING 2006
Columbia University and the Harriman Institute will offer a number
of courses in Ukrainian history, literature and language during the
spring 2006 semester, WHICH WILL BEGIN ON JANUARY 17TH.
Descriptions of the courses offered are as follows (please note
that dates and times are subject to change):

• “History of Modern Ukraine” (W3226) is a course for
undergraduate, as well as graduate, students that covers Ukrainian
history from the eighteenth century to the present. It examines the
connection between modern Ukraine and early modern Ukraine, the
evolution of the Ukrainian national movement, and the
interrelations of the peoples who populated Ukraine (Ukrainians,
Poles, Jews, Russians, etc.). Special attention is paid to the
twentieth century, including the contention of national and Marxist-
Soviet ideologies, and the tragic consequences of Soviet and Nazi
totalitarianism as well as of genocides and wars. The course
concludes with a discussion of the emergence of independent Ukraine
and the state's evolution in the last fifteen years. This course
will be taught on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:10pm-2:25pm in 703
Hamilton Hall. The instructor is Prof. Frank Sysyn, Canadian
Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta.

• “The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Ukraine and Muscovy-Russia
in the Early Modern Period” (G8231) is a course geared towards
graduate students, which examines the polities, societies, and
cultures of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Cossack
Hetmanate, and Muscovy-Imperial Russia in the sixteenth to
eighteenth centuries. Special attention is paid to the interaction
of states and the flow of social models and cultural developments.
The role of Poland in the "Westernization" of Ukraine and Russia,
the relation of Western and Eastern Christianity, the remaking of
Eastern Europe by the rise of the Russian Empire, and the relation
of the political thought and identities of the period to modern
nations are major themes. The course will consist of discussion
sessions based on reading (in English) of monographs on specific
topics. The course will be taught on Mondays from 2:10pm-4:00pm in
1218 International Affairs Building. The instructor is Prof. Frank
Sysyn, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta.

• “Language, Culture, and Identity Issues in Contemporary
Ukraine” (G6100) is an interdisciplinary course geared towards
graduate students. Ukraine, as a nation located on the border
between two different civilizations -- Eurasian and European -- and
exposed to various cultural and political influences throughout its
history, provides students of the region with a great many
paradoxes that often look like ambivalence, if not ambiguity.
Language, culture, and identity issues contribute greatly to
Ukraine’s paradoxes and controversies but, also, to the nation’s
uniqueness and potential dynamic. All these issues will be analyzed
in the proposed course from a cultural-anthropological perspective,
within the context of post-Soviet transition and the processes of
de-communization, de-colonization, ‘delayed’ nation building, and
re-adoption of liberal-democratic ideas of multiculturalism and
multilingualism in a traditionally non-liberal and not-so-
democratic-yet environment. This course will be taught on
Wednesdays from 2:10pm-4:00pm in 406 Hamilton Hall. The instructor
is Mykola Riabchuk, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy.”

• “Elementary Ukrainian II” (W1102) is a course for undergraduate
and graduate students that is designed for individuals with little
or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are
introduced and reinforced with equal emphasis on developing oral
and written communication skills. Specific attention is paid to
acquisition by students of high-frequency vocabulary and its
optimal use in communicative transactions closely imitating real-
life settings. By the end of the course, students are expected to
conduct short conversations concerning common aspects of daily
life; to be able to initiate, maintain, and bring to a close simple
exchanges by asking and responding to all major types of questions;
and to read simple factual texts and write routine messages. The
course will be taught on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:40-6:55 PM
in 716A Hamilton Hall. The instructor is Rory Finnan, Department of
Slavic Languages and Literature, Columbia University.

• “Intermediate Ukrainian II” (W1202) is a course for
undergraduate and graduate students that starts with a review and
subsequent reinforcement of grammar fundamentals and core
vocabulary pertaining to the most common aspects of daily life.
Principal emphasis is placed on further development of students’
communicative skills (oral and written) on such topics as the self,
family, work and leisure, travel, meals and others. A number of
Ukrainian language idiosyncrasies, like verb aspect and verbs of
motion, receive special attention. Course materials are selected
with the aim of introducing students to some functional and
stylistic differences in modern Ukrainian, as well as distinctions
between the Kyiv and Lviv literary variants. By the end of the
course, students will be able to narrate and describe in all major
time frames, and deal effectively with unanticipated complications
in most formal and informal settings. The course will be taught on
Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:10-7:25 PM in 716A Hamilton Hall. The
instructor is Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, Lecturer of Ukrainian Language and
Culture, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literature, Columbia
University.

• “Advanced Ukrainian II” (W3002) is a course for undergraduate and
graduate students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian.
Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation,
participle, gerund, declension of numerals, a more in-depth study
of such difficult subjects as verbal aspect, and verbs of motion.
Original texts and other materials drawn from classical and
contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media and film
are designed to give students familiarity with linguistic features
typical of such functional styles as written and spoken, formal and
informal, scientific and newspaper language, etc. The course is
designed to enable students to discuss extensively a wide range of
general interest topics and some special fields of interest,
particularly relating to their research and work, politics and
culture; to hypothesize; to support opinions and handle
linguistically unfamiliar situations; as well as to conduct
independent field research with Ukrainian language sources. The
classes is taught largely or exclusively in Ukrainian. The course
will be taught on Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:10-5:25 PM in 716A
Hamilton Hall. The instructor is Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, Lecturer of
Ukrainian Language and Culture, Dept. of Slavic Languages and
Literature, Columbia University.

Many of these courses are open, in addition to Columbia students,
to outside individuals interested in non-credit continuing studies,
as well as to students from other universities in the New York
metropolitan area. Undergraduate and graduate students from New
York University can register directly with their school for
Ukrainian language classes at Columbia, while PhD candidates and
master degree students from universities which are part of the
Columbia University Consortium (e.g. NYU, CUNY, New School) can
register for non-language courses by obtaining appropriate approval
from both their home school and Columbia.

For further information, please contact Diana Howansky, Ukrainian
Studies Program at Columbia University, by phone at (212) 854-4697
or by email at dhh2@columbia.edu.

--
Diana Howansky
Staff Associate
Ukrainian Studies Program
Columbia University
Room 1209, MC3345
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-4697
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu
http://www.sipa.columbia.edu/ukrainianstudies/
___________________________________________________________________________

4) Meet the Author at the New York City Book Launch of “Wormwood
Forest: A Natural History of Chernobyl.”

Mary Mycio, former Kyiv correspondent of the Los Angeles Times, has
worked in Ukraine since 1989 and “Wormwood Forest” is a lyrical
account of her personal journeys through the radioactive wilderness
thriving in the Chernobyl zone.

Tuesday, January 24, 2006 – 7PM

The Ukrainian Museum

222 East 6th Street (between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)

New York City

Suggested donation: $10 adults, $5 students and seniors

(includes admission to the Museum’s exhibitions, beginning at 6PM)

A Wine reception will follow.

R.S.V.P.: info@ucca.org

 



1)MOVIE Presentation: “Eve Before Christmas or Nights in the Village of
Dykanka”

When: December 8, 2005, Thursday, 7:30 PM.
Where: Room 614, Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University

The Christmas season is coming and, with it, the time when all kinds of
miracles are happening. Would you like to work a little miracle for
yourself? To extract yourself for one evening from the frenzied shopping
and immerse into the Gogolian world of humor, Ukrainian folklore, and
make-believe? Then come to the December 2005 event of the Ukrainian Film
Club of Columbia University. We shall be screening another Soviet classic
the

“Eve Before Christmas or Nights in the Village of Dykanka”

This full-length feature written and directed by Aleksandr Rou in 1961 is
based on the writings of Mykola Hohol (known throughout the world as
Nikolay Gogol). In the film, being very true to Hohol’s work, reality and
magic go hand in hand. The action takes place in the 18th century, near
the Ukrainian village of Dykanka (Poltava Oblast).

The protagonist, blacksmith Vakula, is enamored with Oksana, the first
beauty of Dykanka. But Oksana presents an apparently impossible
requirement for her hand in marriage: she wants Vakula to bring her the
shoes that the tsarina wears. Vakula’s adventures begin when the habitual
rural life suddenly turns magical on the eve of Christmas. Vakula must
communicate with the former kozak and now sorcerer Patsyuk who becomes his
guide through the magical world.

The script, being true to the “household fantasy” of Hohol, is
also true to the imagery of the typical Ukrainian village and
Ukrainian Christmas traditions portrayed wonderfully on the set
of the film. The Ukrainian culture, unique in its form and
style, is beautifully portrayed in every aspect of the movie.

The film will be shown in its original Russian version peppered with some
Ukrainian idiom and subtitled into
English.

Before the feature presentation, clips of Ukrainian popular groups VV and
Okean Elzy will be shown.

Introduction by Yuri Shevchuk, the director of the Ukrainian Film Club of
Columbia University who will also lead the discussion after the screening.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

2)START SINGING TODAY!

The Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia is hosting a folk singing
workshop by Ukrainian singer and composer MARIANA SADOWSKA.

WHEN: Monday, December 12, 1:00-3:00pm
WHERE: Room 620, Dodge Hall, Columbia University

Ms. Sadowska's recent performances in the United States have included at
the San Francisco World Music Festival; with the eight-woman a cappella
ensemble "Rusalki,"; and with the fiery roots vocal-band Moira Smiley &
VOCO.

THIS WORKSHOP, WHICH IS FREE, WILL BE LIMITED TO THE FIRST 20 INDIVIDUALS
WHO RESPOND, AND SPOTS ARE FILLING QUICKLY, SO TO RESERVE A SPOT, CONTACT
DIANA HOWANSKY AT UKRAINIANSTUDIES@COLUMBIA.EDU OR (212)854-4697.
Non-Ukrainian speakers and novice singers welcome.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

3)RIA Presents:
Movie night : "Slave of Love"

Director: Nikita Mikhalkov

When: Thursday, December 8, 8pm (film lasts 94 minutes)

Where: 702 Hamilton Hall, Columbia Campus

Description:
Renowned director, Nikita Mikhalkov examines the plight of the
filmmaker operating in an uncertain political climate in his
romantic drama/semi-comedy “Raba Lyubvi.” The time is 1918, at the
height of the Bolshevik revolution. A small group of filmmakers are
hurriedly trying to complete a silent melodrama while Russian
society is undergoing dramatic changes. As production progresses,
leading lady, the actress Olga (Yelena Solovey), transforms from
self-centered movie star to committed revolutionary. Now that’s he
and her friends have changed their ideals, what is awaiting them in
the future? The story of “Raba Lyubvi” echoes Chekhov’s motifs and
borrows a few pages from Pirandello. With this move Nikita
Mikhalkov gained his first serious international attention.

For more events, keep on checking our web site at:

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/ukrainian/

 

 

1) Ukrainian Film Club Presents:
- “At the Crossroads”
- “TALENT DEFYING ADVERSITY: NEW FILMS FROM UKRAINE”
WHEN: November 17, 2005, Thursday, at 7:30 PM

WHERE: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University

2) Presentation on the Global Sex Trade: "Becoming Natasha"

When : November 18th,2005, Friday
Where: The evening will begin at 8:30pm Panel Discussion
Begins At 9:20pm At HERE Arts Center 145 6th ave (between Spring and
Broom)

More info:

1) The Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University has just recently
obtained the brand-new Ukrainian, short feature film “At the
Crossroads” (2005, directed by Oleksa Om), and will be adding it to
the short films screened at its next event:

“TALENT DEFYING ADVERSITY: NEW FILMS FROM UKRAINE”

Over the last year, despite the lack of financial support for film-
making from the Ukrainian government and private investors, Ukraine
has not only continued to make films, but has won major
international cinema awards.

For its November event, the Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia
University, will present the works of interesting, talented and
promising Ukrainian artists who persevered in the face of adversity.
These works are unlike anything you have seen before . . . Come and
see for yourself.

The program will premier for the first time in the U.S. the film “At
the Crossroads,” a real-life story of five million Ukrainian
“guestworkers” scattered around the West in search of economic
opportunities for themselves and their families. In Prague, Sashko,
a young musician from Lviv works at a construction site. His beloved
Nelia washes dishes in a posh restaurant. Sashko decides to return
to Ukraine and start a new life there with Nelia. Nelia, it turns
out, is not so sure . . .

“At the Crossroads” also features original songs by the Ukrainian
rock group Okean Elzy, including “For You”, and “I'm Going Home”.

The next Ukrainian Film Club event will also premier the Ukrainian
short feature films:
-- “When I’m Afraid” (director Liusia Pavlenko, 2004, 11 min.)
-- “Hunka” (dir. Olena Tereshkova, 2004, 10 min.)
-- “Oligarch” (dir. Oleksiy Rosych, 2004, 25 min.); and
-- “My Gogol” (dir. Vera Yakovenko, 2003, 20 min.)

All films will be screened in their original Ukrainian or Russian
versions with English subtitles.

In his opening remarks before the screening, Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, the
director of the Ukrainian Film Club, will make an update on the
Ukrainian cinema news. Discussion will follow the screening.

The event is organized jointly with the Ukrainian Student Society of
Columbia University. Snacks and drinks will be provided.

For more information about the films being screened by the Columbia
Ukrainian Film Club, please see the club's website at http://
www.columbia.edu/cu/ufc/.
----------------------------------------------------------------

2)Presentation on the Global Sex Trade: "Becoming Natasha"

When : November 18th,2005
Isadora Productions is presenting their Educational
Outreach Program with Becoming Natasha. This event will bring
together the students and faculty of New School University along
with New York’s major educational institutions to talk about one of
the paramount issues of our time – Human Trafficking.

IP will present a portion of their multimedia work in progress:
Becoming Natasha: a story of six victims of trafficking and their
capacity to survive at any cost, followed by a panel discussion with
educators, artists and activists.

The presentation, produced in part by New School Acting student Nina
Arianda, will provide students with the opportunity to ask questions
about the importance of documentary theatre and the role of activism
in the theatre. The evening will begin at 8:30pm Panel Discussion
Begins At 9:20pm
At HERE Arts Center 145 6th ave (between Spring and Broom)
$10 suggested donation

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

**PLEASE NOTE THIS PERFORMANCE HAS BEEN CHANGED TO THIS FRIDAY**

This Friday, the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia is proud to
present a limited-time-only performance by:

“TEATR-V-KOSHYKU” (THEATER-IN-BASKET)

Presenting Taras Shevchenko’s “The Dream.” A Comedy.
Performed by – Lidiya Danylchuk
Director – Iryna Volytska

Teatr-v-Koshyku, visiting the United States as participants in the
“Best of European Solo Acts” festival in Chicago, is offering a solo
theater performance at Columbia based on the famous poem of Taras
Shevchenko, “The Dream” (1844), which combined in itself the
characteristics of political satire and miracle-play. This
performance is a poetical-philosophical reflection on the historical
fate of Ukraine and, at the same time, a unique commentary in the
cultural context about the first half of the 19th century, where
Gogol, Pushkin and Mickiewicz intersected.

The lyrical hero of Shevchenko, in his dreams, flies above the Earth
and is exposed to strange visions, similar to the apocalyptic visions
of Dante and Goya. Like in a kaleidoscope, chimerical images appear
and change: three ravens, which symbolize the bad powers of the
Ukrainian, Russian and Polish nations; idylls of Ukrainian nature and
pseudo national outpourings of feelings; military operations and
drills; Petersburg with the tsar and tsarina, as despotic officials
and imperial monuments. Phantasmagoria, visions, and images,
presented in a parodic, sarcastic and grotesque display, refer to the
tragedy of Ukrainian history.

This contemporary theatrical version of “The Dream” appeals to the
past, as well as to the current-day. It is a performance-parting with
the totalitarian system in any of its form, with post-imperial
syndromes and complexes of national inferiority.

WHEN: Friday, November 11 at 7:00pm
WHERE: LeRoy Neiman Gallery, Dodge Hall, Columbia University
LANGUAGE: The main language will be Ukrainian, but non-Ukrainian
speakers will be able to follow the performance as well.
COST: The performance is free, but a minimum donation of $10 for
Teatr-v-Koshyku is suggested.

***********************************************************************

Iryna Volytska-Zubko: PhD, specialist in drama study, critic, stage
director. Prizewinner of Les Kurbas National Theatrical Award.
Graduated from Saint-Petersburg Institute of Theatre, Music and
Cinematography. Brings theatre study into concord with stage and art
director practice at “Theatre-in-Basket,” which as of 2004 became an
affiliate project of Les Kurbas National Centre for Dramatic Art
(Kyiv). Iryna Volytska-Zubko is the author of several monographies
and many articles on the history of Ukrainian theatre. As a stage
director of “Theatre-in-Basket,” she produced six critically
acclaimed performances based on Ukrainian classics.

Lidiya Danylchuk: Actress. Prizewinner of Ivan Kotliarevsky National
Theatrical Award. Graduated from Karpenko-Karyy National Theatre
Institute (Kyiv). Stage career both in Odessa and Lviv top theatres.
In 1997, together with Iryna Volytska-Zubko, she co-founded the
independent art-studio “Theatre-in-Basket,” where she now performs as
a leading actress. She received high renown and many awards for her
superior acting skills, both in Ukraine and abroad.

For more information, please contact Diana Howansky at
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu or (212)854-4697.

(Please note that Teatr-v-Koshyku will also be performing "THE WHITE
BUTTERFLIES, THE PLAITED CHAINS," based on letters and novels written
by Vasyl Stefanyk, on Saturday, November 12 at Shevchenko Scientific
Society, 63 Fourth Avenue, New York, 212-254-5130.)

P.S. If everyone doesn't know by now, Klischko retired! NO more fights...
:( Sadness...

November Events and Cool things to check out brought to you by the
Ukrainian Students Association:

1. Action Without Borders Global Campaign : Translators WANTED!
2. “TEATER-V-KOSHYKU” (THEATER-IN-A-BASKET) PERFORMS SHEVCHENKO’S “SON”
(THE DREAM)
3. “TALENT DEFYING ADVERSITY: NEW FILMS FROM UKRAINE.”
4. Sly Fox Music Showcase
5. The Klitschko Fight
6. Something to check out : http://nycslav.blogspot.com/
7. Isadora Productions is presenting their Educational Outreach
Program with "Becoming Natasha".
8. Don’t forget to visit the Ukrainian Students Association’s web-site, as
well as Ukrainian Film Club’s web-site:
1) www.columbia.edu/cu/ukrainian

2) www.columbia.edu/cu/ufc

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THE EVENTS:

1).

Action Without Borders/Idealist.org is launching a global campaign designed
to connect people, organizations and resources online and face-to- face. For
information about the campaign, please click here:
http://invite.idealist.org.

We're looking for volunteers in New York City who can translate materials
from English into Ukrainian. As a Ukrainian translator for the
campaign,
you'll be part of a team who will help us promote the campaign in
Ukrainian speaking communities around the world. We encourage you to
apply if:

* You're a native speaker, reader and writer of Ukrainian who is also
proficient in English
* You enjoy editing and writing in Ukrainian
* You can commit to volunteering up to five hours a week through
mid-December
* You live in the New York City area

If you're interested in learning more, please register for the orientation
meeting on Wednesday, November 9. Click here to register:
http://www.idealist.org/event/91375-232

Email joanna@idealist.org if you have any questions.

2)
Thursday, November 10, Time 7:00pm: “TEATER-V-KOSHYKU”
(THEATER-IN-A-BASKET)
PERFORMS SHEVCHENKO’S “SON” (THE DREAM) -- Do not miss this limited-
time-only performance! Invited to the United States to participate in
the “Best of European Solo Acts” festival in Chicago, the
independent Ukrainian art-studio “Teater-v-Koshyku” will perform a
comedic theatrical production of Taras Shevchenko’s famous poem
“The Dream” (written in 1844), which unites political satire with
artistic action. This production is a poetical-philosophical
reflection on the historical fate of Ukraine and, at the same time,
a unique commentary in a cultural context on the first half of the
19th century, when Gogol, and Pushkin, and Mickiewicz intersected.
Under the direction of Ms. Iryna Volytska-Zubka, “The Dream” will
be performed by Lidiya Danylchuk, a graduate from the Karpenko-
Karyy National Theatre Institute in Kyiv and winner of the Ivan
Kotliarevsky National Theatrical Award. Location: LeRoy Neiman
Gallery, Dodge Hall, Columbia University.

3)

Wednesday, November 16, Time: 12pm-1:30pm.: “WHY TAKE UKRAINIAN
STUDIES?” The Ukrainian Studies Program will host a lunchtime
discussion with
professionals who work with Ukraine in various spheres (media,
NGOs, the arts, etc.), and who will speak about the link between
studying Ukrainian issues and the relevance of this information in
the real, work world. Representatives from Freedom House, NBC
Universal, the Yara Arts Group, and the United Nations Association
of New York are scheduled to attend. Pizza will be served. Columbia
students and members of the public alike are welcome to come listen
and schmooze. Location: Room 1219, International Affairs Building,
Columbia University.

4)

Thursday, November 17, Location: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia
University. Time: 7:30pm.
“TALENT DEFYING ADVERSITY: NEW FILMS FROM
UKRAINE.” Over the last year, despite the lack of financial support
for film-making from the Ukrainian government and private
investors, Ukraine has not only continued to make films, but has
won major international cinema awards. For its November event, the
Ukrainian Film Club of Columbia University, will present the works
of interesting, talented and promising Ukrainian artists who
persevered in the face of adversity. The program will include films
made within the last three years, including animation such as:
“Streetcar #9” (director Stepan Koval, 2002, 10 min.);
“Kompromiks” (2002, 5 min.) and “The Snow Will Cover the
Roads” (2004, 7 min.) (both directed by Yevhen Syvokin);
“Next” (dir. Anatoliy Lavrenyshyn, 2003, 3 min.); “Bad Omen” (dir.
Oksana Chernenko, 2004, 4 min.); and short features such as: “When
I’m Afraid” (dir. Liusia Pavlenko, 2004, 11 min.); “Hunka” (dir.
Olena Tereshkova, 2004, 10 min.), “Oligarch” (dir. Oleksiy Rosych,
2004, 25 min.); and “My Gogol” (dir. Vera Yakovenko, 2003, 20 min.) Dr.
Yuri Shevchuk, director of the Ukrainian Film Club, will also
give an update of Ukrainian cinema news. Snacks and drinks will be
provided by the Columbia Ukrainian Student Society.

For more information about these events, please contact Diana
Howansky at (212) 854-4697 or ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu.
--
Diana Howansky
Staff Associate
Ukrainian Studies Program
Columbia University
Room 1209, MC3345
420 W. 118th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-4697
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu
http://www.sipa.columbia.edu/ukrainianstudies/

5)
Sly Fox Music Showcase - Nov. 2005

Stefko and co. take the stage armed with acoustic instruments and a
deep rooted sense of melancholy. With special guest performance by
Voice-1. Not to be missed! Show costs $5 at the door. Here's the crew
that's playing:

KATE (http://www.myspace.com/katemusic)

MATT LOGAN (http://www.myspace.com/matthewloganmusic)

STEFKO (http://www.myspace.com/stefko)

with special appearance by Voice-1 (www.subwaystiles.com)

Matt will be join both myself and Kate on the cello during our
respective sets. The show takes place in the back room behind the
restaurant! Do it!!!!

6)
The Klitschko Fight
When : November, 12th
For more information , please visit:
http://www.hbo.com/boxing/

7)

When : November 18th,
Isadora Productions is presenting their Educational
Outreach Program with Becoming Natasha. This event will bring
together the students and faculty of New School University along
with New York’s major educational institutions
to talk about one of the paramount issues of our
time – Human Trafficking.

IP will present a portion of their multimedia work in progress:
Becoming Natasha: a story of six victims of trafficking and their
capacity to survive at any cost, followed by a panel discussion with
educators, artists and activists.

The presentation, produced in part by New School Acting student Nina
Arianda, will provide students with the opportunity to ask
questions about the importance of documentary theatre and the role of
activism in the theatre. The evening will begin at 8:30pm
Panel Discussion Begins At 9:20pm
At HERE Arts Center 145 6th ave (between Spring and Broom)
$10 suggested donation

 

As we approach the end of October, it is time to take a break
from all of the midterms, relax, and get your mind off of classes
and work. Check out the following events that are going to take
place and mark your calendars! Don't miss out on great social and
cultural opportunities!

1. Ukrainian Film Club -Soviet Horror Film "Viy" - October 27,2005
7:30pm
2. Lecture - "Agony and Ecstasy: Ukrainian Cinema Since
Independence" with special guest speaker, Prof. Serhiy Bukovsky
3. Meeting with members of Penn, Princeton, Rutgers, and NYU
Ukrainian clubs!
4. Lecture by Anna Fournier (John Hopkins University) "Educational
Practice and the Making of Citizens in Ukraine Before and After the
Orange Revolution"
5. Halloween Party with the Russian International Association
6. Ukrainian Chorus DUMKA 55th Anniversary Performance
7. PBS Frontline "Murder in Kyiv"
8. UABA - seminar on attorney career paths

-------------------------------------------------------------------

1. The showing of “Viy”

When: October 27, 2005, Thursday, 7:30 PM
Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University

"Viy" or the Spirit of Evil a full-length feature film, director
Kostiantyn Yershov, 1967.

This classical picture, often billed as the first Soviet horror
film, is based on the eponymous short story by the Ukrainian born
and
reared 19th-century writer Mykola Hohol who, later in his life, came
to be known around the world as Nikolay Gogol.

Since its release in 1967, “Viy” the film has captivated the
imagination of millions thanks to its combination of the best talent
that Soviet cinema could offer, and a wealth of cultural material –
legends, myths, songs, history, and language that are unmistakably
Ukrainian. Rarely did the Soviet censors allow such a breathtaking
departure from the strictures of socialist realism, such an
unabashed
celebration of the spirit of Ukraine – all largely due to the fact
that the picture was produced not in Ukraine, ever suspected of
disloyalty for Moscow, but in Russia, at the Mosfilm Studios.

Restored to its original color version “Viy” features a
constellation of Soviet cinema stars: the tragicomic Leonid
Kuravliov, the beautiful Natalya Varley, and the legend of Ukrainian
stage and screen Mykola Yakovchenko.

“Viy” was directed by the Ukrainian film-maker and actor
Kostiantyn Yershov, who started his career in Kyiv, where he played
in the Lesia Ukrainka Russian Drama Theater, Later he made a number
of films at the Mosfilm and Lenfilm Studios (Russia) and then, from
1968 till his death in 1984, worked for the Dovzhenko Film Studios
(Kyiv, Ukraine).

“Viy” will be shown in its original Russian language version
with some peppering of Ukrainian idiom, for verisimilitude, with
English subtitles.

The film will be introduced by Yuri Shevchuk, the director of
the Ukrainian Film Club. Discussion will follow the screening.

This event is organized jointly with the Ukrainian Student
Society of Columbia University.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

2. "Agony and Ecstasy: Ukrainian Cinema Since Independence"

When: Tuesday, October 25, 2005, 2:00 PM
Where: Room 1219, International Affairs Building (12th floor), 420
W. 118th St. (and Amsterdam Ave.), Columbia University, New York,
NY
"Agony and Ecstasy: Ukrainian Cinema Since Independence" with
special guest speaker, Prof. Serhiy Bukovsky ,the leading Ukrainian
documentary filmmaker, winner of the 2002 Taras
Shevchenko National Prize, author of the sensational documentary
“War. Ukrainian Account”, and professor of the Ivan Karpenko Kary
National University for Theater, Cinema, and Television. Prof.
Bukovsky will share his thoughts about the current state of
Ukrainian cinema and its prospects for the future. The event will
include screenings of some of Bukovsky’s work, with subsequent
discussion.

Mediated by Dr. Yuri Shevchuk, lecturer of Ukrainian language and
culture, and director of the Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia
University.

For additional information, please contact Diana Howansky at (212)
854-4697 or ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

3. Members from the Penn Ukrainian Club will be traveling up to see
the lecture by Anna Fournier. After the lecture we will meet up for
dinner and drinks. All those who are interested in coming, please
RSVP to Adrian aap2003@columbia.edu. Members from Local Ukrainian
Clubs (Penn, Princeton, Rutgers, NYU) will be there. Possibly other
schools as well. Should be a great time and a great opportunity to
meet other Ukrainians from around the area.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

4. "Educational Practice and the Making of Citizens in Ukraine
Before and After the Orange Revolution" by Anna Fournier (John
Hopkins University)

When:Saturday, Oct 29 2005 at 5:00 PM
Where: Shevchenko Scientific Society
63 Fourth Avenue
between 9th & 10th St.
New York, NY 10003, USA
(tel) 212-254-5130
(fax) 212-254-5239
--------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Eastern Block Halloween Party
When: Friday October 28th, 2005, Doors open at 10pm
(Must have 21 ID to enter)
Where: 58 (Formerly Au Bar)
41 East 58th St.
(between Park and Madison)

FREE admission before 11pm!
Sponsored vodka open bar 10pm-11pm

**Costumes are strongly suggested**

Come party with the Eastern Bloc on Halloween! Dress up in your
favorite costume and join us for a great time! It'll be so much
fun, it's scary!

Featuring:

DJ Crooked & DJ Max
DJ Crooked spinning Hip Hop, Rock and 80's
DJ Max spinning House

Make sure to ask for the Eastern Block Halloween Party guestlist
upon arriving.
All will receive complimentary admission before 11pm and reduced
admission after 11pm.
See Saki at the door.

------------------------------------------------------------------

6. Ukrainian Chorus Dumka

55th Anniversary Concert of the Ukrainian Chorus "Dumka" of New York
When : Sunday, October 30, 2005 - 3:00pm
Where: New York University
The Skirball Center for the Performing Arts
60 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
How much: Tickets: $20 ($15 Students)

Guest appearance by Oksana Krovytska
of the New York City Opera
Vasyl Hrechynsky - Artistic Director and Conductor
Laryssa Hutnykevich - Piano

For more information, contact:
Mr. Yuri Shtohryn; (212) 874-0976

--------------------------------------------------------------------

7. 'Murder in Kyiv' PBS's Frontline/WORLD

The show "Murder in Kyiv" will air on PBS's Frontline/WORLD on
October 25th. The program takes an in-depth look at political reform
in Ukraine through the lens of the well-known 'Gongadze case.'

------------------------------------------------------------------

8. UABA - seminar on attorney career paths

Have you ever thought about a career as an attorney?
The Ukrainian American Bar Association (UABA) is hosting a short
seminar on "attorney career paths".
I and other attorneys with a Ukrainian connection will provide
remarks and be available for questions and answers. In attendance
will be attorneys from a range of backgrounds, including
government, in-house and private practice.
If this does not interest you, please feel welcome to forward this
email to those who may be interested.

Seminar details: www.uaba.org
RSVP appreciated, but not required.

Here are NEW and EXCITING events brought to you by the Ukrainian
Students Society at Columbia University:

1)Ukrainian Launguage Workshop at the Hungarian Cafe.
2)Ukrainian Film Club Presents "Viy".
3)An International Graduate Student Symposium
Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies on
the topic of " Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics,
History, and Culture".
4)WANTED: Ukrainian Translator for ABC Sports
5)WANTED: Ukrainian or Russian professional with Neuropsuchology
experience.
6) We are still looking cool T-shirt Ideas!

1)Ukrainian Launguage Workshop at the Hungarian Cafe.
When: Friday morning, October 14th. 10:30-11:30
Where: The hungarian coffee shop
Start off your morning with a fresh cup of coffee and a pastry, and
join others in dicussion about the current events in Ukraine,
practice your Ukrainian language skills, or mabe learn a word or
two.

2)Ukrainian film club next showing
http//www.columbia.edu/cu/ufc
When: October 27, 2005, Thursday, 7:30 PM
Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia University
This event is organized jointly with the Ukrainian Student
Society of Columbia University.

After a year dominated by serious and art-house films, the Ukrainian
Film Club at Columbia will turn to the purely entertaining genre of
horror movies. The Club’s October 2005 event will feature
“Viy” or Spirit of Evil , a full-length feature film, director
Konstantin Yershov, 1967.
This classical picture, often billed as the first and last Soviet
horror film, is based on the eponymous short story by the Ukrainian
born and reared 19th-century writer Mykola Hohol who later in his
life came to be known around the world as Nikolay Gogol.
Since its release in 1967, “Viy” the film has captivated
the imagination of millions thanks to its rare combination of the
best talent that Soviet cinema could offer, and a wealth of cultural
material – legends, myths, songs, history, and language that are
unmistakably and uniquely Ukrainian. Rarely did the Soviet censors
allow such a breathtaking departure from the strictures of socialist
realism, such an unabashed celebration of the spirit of Ukraine –
all largely due to the fact that the picture was produced not in
Ukraine, ever suspected of disloyalty for Moscow, but in Russia, at
the Lenfilm Studios.
Beautifully restored to its original color version “Viy”
features a constellation of Soviet area cinema stars: the tragicomic
Leonid Kuravliov, the terrifyingly beautiful Nataliya Varley, and
the legend of Ukrainian cinema Mykola Yakovchenko.
“Viy” will be shown in its original Russian language
version with some peppering of Ukrainian idiom, for verisimilitude,
with English subtitles.
The film will be introduced by Yuri Shevchuk, the director
of the Ukrainian Film Club. Discussion will follow the screening.
This event is organized jointly with the Ukrainian Student
Society of Columbia University.

3)An International Graduate Student Symposium

University of Toronto’s Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian
Studies (CERES) will be hosting a graduate student symposium on the
topic“New Perspectives on Contemporary Ukraine: Politics, History,
and Culture” on March 17-19, 2006. Attached is a Call for Papers.

4)WANTED: Ukrainian Translator for ABC Sports

ABC Sports is doing a story on the Ukrainian national soccer team
and its entry into the World Cup, and needs individuals who can act
as translators during phone calls to Ukraine. If interested, please
contact Amanda Fletcher at 212-456-0328 or amanda.k.fletcher.-
nd@abc.com.

 

5)WANTED: Ukrainian or Russian professional with Neuropsuchology
experience.

This project contains Neuropsych evaluations of young adults between
17-20 years old and we are desperately searching for a Ukrainian
and/or Russian speaking professional with neuropsychology
experience. We are administering 4 subscles of the WAIS (Wechsler
Adult Intelligence Scale) in this follow-up study with roughly 150
of the interviews in Ukrainian (roughly 20% -- the rest are
Russian). We are in most urgent and desperate need of a Ukrainian
speaker with this kind of experience. We are looking for someone
here, preferably on the East coast of the US, who would be
qualified for this task.

If you know of anyone, friends, colleagues, professors etc - with an
interest and related experience we'd be greatly appreciative.

Contact Information:
Psychiatry Dept.
Putnam Hall, So. Campus
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, NY 11794
Tel: 631-632-3721
e: dtaormin@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

 

6) We are still looking cool T-shirt Ideas!

Looking for tshirt desgn idea's again!!!!!! We are planning to make
them even better then last years thongs and tshirts!!! all idea's
please send to Lydia Doll ld2198@columbia.edu

==========================================================

Hi Everyone!

Here is a little update on what is being planned by the Ukrainian
Students Society , so you have some exciting things to look forward to in
the near future.
Also, check out our AweSome website at: www.columbia.edu/cu/ukrainian

 

1)Soccer Game
2)Ukrainian Dancing
3)Ukr. Club T-shirt design and production
4)Klitschko's Win (pictures are on the website)
5)The recent events in ukraine

Details:

1) Sunday, October 2nd.
Soccer Game: We have planned a Russian Club vs Ukrainian Club soccer
game in Riverside Park at the 107th street field. We will meet at
3:30 on South Field on Columbia's campus (115th & Broadway) and go to the
park together. Email Dmytro (dk2204@columbia.edu) if you are
interested in playing.

2)If anyone is interested in doing Ukrainian Dance this year, classes are
starting soon. Classes are every Saturday usually 6-9. The
ensemble is called Syzokryli and they have performed all over the
world, most recently at Lincoln Center. If you are a dancer (ballet,
jazz, folk dancer, etc.) feel free to contact them about classes. It is a
great time. High jumping, kicking, twirling. You name it, they got it!
Also, you don't need to be Ukrainian to do Ukrainian
Dancing. The website is http://www.syzokryli.com/
To find out more about the company, email Andrij Cybyk
(syzokryli@yahoo.com)
Also, if anyone wants to watch some videos of it to get alittle more
familiarized you can contact adrian for them aap2003@columbia.edu

3)The Ukrainian Students Society will be making tshirts this year and are
looking for people to help with the design and production. If you are
interested in helping and putting in your input, email adrian at
aap2003@columbia.edu. We have some great ideas and we are looking for me!

4) ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- Wladimir Klitschko's chin betrayed him yet
again, but this time his stamina didn't.

Klitschko, despite suffering three knockdowns before 10,137 on
Saturday night at Boardwalk Hall, survived to outlast Samuel Peter and win
a unanimous decision.

Klitschko found himself down three times, but Peter (right) could not land
a finishing blow.
The 12-round verdict might not have restored Klitschko -- getting
knocked down three times won't do that -- but winning the heavyweight
title elimination bout earned him mandatory challenger status for the
titles held by Chris Byrd and Lamon Brewster.

The victory didn't come without a serious struggle against the
heavily hyped Peter (24-1).

The 24-year-old self-proclaimed "Nigerian Nightmare," had caught a big
buzz in the boxing world with his string of exciting knockouts, but
against Klitschko he was taking a big step up in competition.

He chased Klitschko (45-3) for most of the fight, looking to land one big
shot. And he did just that three times, knocking Klitschko down twice in
the fifth round and again in the 10th.

But Klitschko, whose weak chin and lack of stamina were exposed in
stunning upset knockout loss to Corrie Sanders and Brewster, was able to
survive.

"I have put my losses behind me," Klitschko said. "Boxing is a lot of fun,
simple as that. I am ready to fight anyone."

In the end, all three judges scored it the same: 114-111.

"Peter was a very strong opponent, but he kept hitting me in the back of
the head," said Klitschko, once considered the division's heir
apparent, a role Peter had taken over before the fight.

"It's wonderful to be back in the heavyweight picture. Hopefully, I
convinced some of the critics that I have the stamina to go 12 rounds."

Peter showed that his power is genuine and that he also had a solid chin,
taking some big punches from Klitschko, the younger brother of heavyweight
champ Vitali Klitschko. But Peter also was exposed as a one-dimensional
fighter that Klitschko was able to outbox for much of the fight. By the
end of the bout, the inexperienced Peter was also even more exhausted than
Klitschko as he gasped for air.

"I took his best punch and knocked him down three times," Peter said. "I
came to win but he did his best and he beat me. He beat me today, but
maybe on my best day I can beat him. I learned from the
experience of being in with a top opponent for the first time."

 

REUTERS/Tim Shaffer
Klitschko (right) landed 204 punches, Peter just 100. All three
judges scored it 114-111 for Klitschko.
With a six-inch height advantage quicker hands, Klitschko was able to box,
jab and move out of the way of the oncoming rush. But Peter
pressured him so much, Peter was bound to land an effective blow.

It happened in the fifth, when Peter landed a clubbing right hand
near the back of Klitschko's head. He went down face-first but was up at
the count of six from referee Randy Neumann.

But 30 seconds later, Klitschko went down again on a half-push, half-
right hand.

In the past, Klitschko fell apart under such adversity, but this time he
willed himself through it.

Peter, still stalking in the 10th, cornered Klitschko and then chased him
across the ring throwing shots until a straight right landed on
Klitschko's chin and dropped him along the ropes.

Klitschko was up quickly but Peter continued landing until the bell rang.

Peter, his eyes swelling closed, still was gunning for a knockout in the
12th round. He was swinging wild lefts and wobbled Klitschko. But moments
later, Klitschko landed a shot that buckled Peter, who was spitting blood
in the closing seconds.

5) UKRAINE: NEW CABINET OF MINISTERS BEGINS TO TAKE SHAPE

The Action Ukraine Report (AUR)
Compiled from twenty-five news stories published
by the Ukrainian News Service, Kyiv, Ukraine
Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, September 28, 2005

The following has been reported by the Ukrainian News Service:

[1] SECRETARY OF NATIONAL SECURITY & DEFENSE COUNCIL:
President Viktor Yuschenko has appointed Anatolii Kinakh as Secretary of
the National Security and Defense Council.

Kinakh, 51, was First Deputy Prime Minister in Yulia Tymoshenko's
government since February. From September 8 to September 27, he
worked as Acting First Deputy Premier.

Yuschenko reduced the authorities of the National Security and Defense
Council's Secretary. Before early September, the post was occupied by
Petro Poroshenko

[2[ FIRST DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER: As Ukrainian News reported, on
September 27, Yuschenko appointed Stanislav Stashevsyi First Deputy
Premier, replacing Kinakh at the post.

Stashevskyy was elected to parliament in March 2002. He is a member of the
parliament budget committee. Before being elected an MP, he was the deputy
head of Kiev city state administration and a member of the Unity [Yednist]
party [led by Kiev mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko].

Stashevskyy was born in 1943. He graduated from Kiev Polytechnical
Institute in 1972, majoring in electric engineering. Stashevskyy has a
degree in technical science.

Stashevskyy was a deputy director and chief engineer of
Kievelectromontazh company from 1979 to 1987. In 1987, he became
a deputy head of the main directorate for housing and civil construction
of Kiev executive committee. In 1992, Stashevskyy was appointed first
vice-president of the state municipal construction corporation
Kievmiskbud.

In 1996, he became the first vice-president of the Hlavkievmiskbud holding.
From October 1996 to March 2001, Stashevskyy was the first deputy head
of Kiev city state administration. In March-November 2001, he was
fuel and
energy minister.

Stashevskyy is a member of the Construction Academy and a distinguished
builder of Ukraine.

[3 DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER: President Viktor Yuschenko has appointed
Viacheslav Kyrylenko as deputy prime minister.

37-year old Kyrylenko served as Minister of Labor and Social Policy in the
Cabinet led by former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko.

[4] DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER: President Viktor Yuschenko has appointed Roman
Bezsmertnyi as deputy prime minister.

39-year old Bezsmertnyi hold the post of the deputy prime minister for
territorial administrative reform in the Cabinet led by former Prime
Minister Yulia Tymoshenko.

[5] MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS: President Viktor Yuschenko
has appointed Borys Tarasiuk as Minister for Foreign Affairs. Tarasiuk,
56, served in the previous Cabinet led by former Prime Minister Yulia
Tymoshenko

[6] MINISTER OF ECONOMY: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Arsenii Yatseniuk as Minister of Economy
.
By another decree, Yuschenko dismissed Serhii Teriokhin from the
post of Economy Minister.

As Ukrainian News reported, since March Yatseniuk was the first deputy
governor of the Odesa region. Yatseniuk occupied the post of the first
deputy chairman of the National Bank of Ukraine from January 2003 to
February 2005, and resigned from the post due to disagreements with NBU
chairman Volodymyr Stelmakh.

[7] MINISTER OF FUEL & ENERGY:Today Ivan Plachkov was re-appointed as fuel
and energy minister. The 48-year old Plachkov served the post of the fuel
and energy minister in the Cabinet of Ministers led by Yulia Tymoshenko.

[8] MINISTER OF COAL INDUSTRY: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Viktor Topolov as Minister of Coal Industry. The 59-year old
Topolov served as Minister of Labor and Social Policy in the Cabinet led
by former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko.
.
Yuschenko appointed Topolov as Minister of Coal Industry on August 18, and
on July 25 reorganized Fuel and Energy Ministry and created Ministry of
Coal Industry.

[9]] MINISTER OF EMERGENCY SITUATIONS: President Viktor
Yuschenko has appointed Viktor Baloha as Minister for Emergency
Situations and Protection of Population from Chornobyl Accident
Consequences.

The 42-year old Baloha has chaired the Zakarpattia regional state
administration since February 4.

[10] MINISTER OF AGRARIAN POLICY: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Oleksandr Baranivskyi as Minister of Agrarian Policy. The
50-year old Baranivskyi served as agrarian minister in the previous
Cabinet led by former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. He is a
member of the Socialist Party.

[11] MINISTER OF AFFAIRS OF FAMILY, YOUTH & SPORT: President
Viktor Yuschenko has appointed Yurii Pavlenko as Minister for Affairs of
Family, Youth and Sport. The 30-year old Pavlenko served in the previous
Cabinet led by former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko.

[12] MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: President Viktor
Yuschenko has appointed Pavlo Ihnatenko as Minister of Environmental
Protection. Ihnatenko served in the Cabinet led by former Prime Minister
Yulia Tymoshenko.

[13] MINISTER OF EDUCATION: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Stanislav Nikolaenko as Minister of Education and Science.
Nikolaenko, 49, served in the previous Cabinet led by former Prime
Minister Yulia Tymoshenko

[14] MINISTER OF INDUSTRIAL POLICY: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Volodymyr Shandra as Industrial Policy Minister. On
February 4, Yuschenko appointed Shandra as Industrial Policy Minister in
the Tymoshenko-led Cabinet of Minister.

From 2002 through March 2005, Shanra was a deputy of the Verkhovna
Rada, and earlier worked as board chairman of Slavuta ruberoid plant.

[15] MINISTER OF THE CABINET OF MINISTRY: President Viktor
Yuschenko has relieved Petro Krupko from the post of Minister of the
Cabinet of Ministers and appointed Bohdan Butsa to replace him.

In February, Yuschenko appointed Krupko as First Deputy Minister of the
Cabinet of Ministers, having relieved him from the post of Deputy
Minister
of the Cabinet.

Butsa, 45, Verkhovna Rada's deputy (accepted its deputative powers on July
8) was elected from the list of Our Ukraine block of parties
under No.
93. In Rada, he replaced Oleksii Ivchenko, board chairman of the nation
joint stock company Naftohaz Ukrainy.

[16] MINISTER OF DEFENCE: Anatoliy Hrytsenko will stay on as defence minister

[17] MINISTER OF THE INTERIOR MINISTER: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Yurii Lutsenko as the Interior Affairs Minister.

Lutsenko, 40, served as acting Interior Affairs Minister after the dismissal
of the Yulia Tymoshenko-led Cabinet of Ministers. He was appointed as
Interior Affairs Minister on February 4.

After his appointment to the post in February, Lutsenko said that his main
task was to change the image of the Interior Affairs Ministry. He
promised
to decriminalize and depoliticize the organs of the Interior Affairs
Ministry.

Several personnel changes have been made in the leadership of the
ministry
and its regional divisions since Lutsenko's appointment. After his first 100
days in office, Lutsenko positively appraised the process of
decriminalization and de-politicization of the ministry.

After this, he outlined the five priorities of the police for 2005: full
control over the sale of spirit in Ukraine, ending illegal use of
natural
resources, establishing control over the procedures for registering
automobiles, continuing the fight against election crime, and reforming
the police.

[18] MINISTER OF LABOR & SOCIAL POLICY: President Viktor Yuschenko has
appointed Ivan Sakhan to the post of labor and social policy
minister.

From April 2004, Sakhan, 57, held the post of director general at
Ukrainian
Aluminum company, a subsidiary of Russian Aluminum that was later
renamed into Aluminum of Ukraine.

Sakhan served as labor and social policy minister from June 1998 to
November 2002 when the government was led by Valerii Pustovoitenko, Viktor
Yuschenko and Anatolii Kinakh.

As Ukrainian News earlier reported, Yuschenko removed Viacheslav
Kyrylenko from the post of labor and social policy minister and
appointed
him deputy prime minister.

[19] MINISTRY OF CULTURE: President Viktor Yuschenko has relieved
Oksana Bilozir of her duties as Minister for Culture and Tourism.

Bilozir is a leader of the Social-Christian Party since April 2004.
From May
2002 through March 2005 she was a deputy of the Verkhovna Rada from the
faction of Our Ukraine block of parties.

[20] MINISTRY OF JUSTICE: President Viktor Yuschenko has relieved
Roman Zvarych from the post of Justice Minister. due to resignation of the
Cabinet of Ministers.

[21] MINISTRY OF HEALTH: President Viktor Yuschenko has removed
Mykola Polischuk from the post of health minister.

Polischuk was a member of parliament in the Our Ukraine faction from May
2002 to July 2005.

=================================================


Greetings!

Ukrainian Students Society invites you to come and check out the exciting
events offered to everyone who is interested in history, culture, and
traditions of Ukraine!

Here is a brief list of events that are going to take place next week. For
more information about every happening, please scroll down.

1. Columbia’s Ukrainian Students Society WELCOME DINNER ( Wednesday,
September 21st, place and time TBD). Don’t miss it!!!!
2. Klitschko fighting in Atlantic City
3. Ukrainian Festival at Giants Stadium
4. Ukrainian Foreign Minister’s visit to Columbia University
5. Beer night
6. Ukrainian theater company anniversary presentation
7. Russian vs. Ukrainian Soccer Game
8. CUTTA is looking for Ukrainian and Russian translators
9. Ukrainian Film Club

DETAILS about the events:

1)BIG WELCOME DINNER!
Borscht, Holobschi, Varenuku, Kvas, Salo... you name it we got it!!!
It will be Wednesday September 21st.... Time and Place TBA

2) The club might be able to get discounted tickets to the fight which
will be happening September 24th in Atlantic City. The tickets
should be around 50 dollars. On September 24th in Atlantic City, New
Jersey (USA) inside Boardwalk Hall, Wladimir “Dr. Steelhammer”
Klitschko (44-3, 40 KO) will face Samuel “Nigerian Nightmare” Peter
(24-0, 21 KO) for WBO and IBF eliminator fight in heavyweight division.

If you are interested in going to the fight, please contact Adrian
dk2204@columbia.edu. There will be some people driving down and we
can get rides that way... possibly hit up the casinos after the fight
as well!

3) Ukrainian Festival at Giants Stadium this Saturday 17th
http://www.socceragency.net/ukraine/

4) On Wednesday, September 21st, BORYS TARASIUK, Foreign Minister of
Ukraine, will speak at Columbia University at 11:30am in Room 1501 of
the International Affairs Building (IAB), 420 W. 118th St., Columbia
University. Tarasiuk is scheduled to speak about about Ukraine's
foreign policy, with specific reference to Europe, the U.S., and Russia.

5) On Thursday September 22, 2005 the Ukrainian Professionals at the
Institute are hosting a fun-and-light social networking event for
Ukrainian professionals & friends.
Come with your friends and colleagues to join us for gourmet pizza
and beer.The evening promises to be filled with interesting people and
stimulating conversation.
See the attached invitation for details.
We look forward to seeing you there!
Please feel free to send your questions and comments to this e-mail
address.
ukrprofessionalsinstitute@gmail.com
The Organizing Committee

6) Come Celebrate 15 Years of YARA ARTS GROUP!
resident company of La MaMa Experimental Theatre
see two film premières, performances of poetry, music & party:

Saturday September 24, 2005
7:00 “The Whisperer” a 30 minute documentary film by Andrea Odezynska
explores her encounter with a village healer in western Ukraine that
changes Andrea’s life forever.
8:00 “InVerse” actors perform poetry in Yara’s signature style –
interweaving originals with English translations and music from
Yara’s theatre pieces, directed by Virlana Tkacz.
9:00 “A Light from the East” a film b y Amy Grappell about her
participation in the first collaborative theatre project in Kiev, as
the Soviet Union collapses.
Party
La MaMa Theatre 74 East 4th St (2nd Ave & Bowery), New York City
tickets $20 / artists & students $10, for info call Yara (212)
475-6474 www.brama.com/yara

 

7) RUSSIAN VS. UKRAINIAN SOCCER GAME

We have planned a soccer game with the Russian International
Association (RIA) at Columbia.
Just to get a rough headcount, if you are interested in playing for
our team, please send an e-mail to dk2204@columbia.edu with the
subject line "soccer". Stay tuned for more details!

What: Soccer!
When: Sunday, October 2 at 4:00pm
Where: Morningside Park

 

8) The Columbia University Tutoring and Translating Agency (CUTTA) is a
student-run enterprise that provides Tutoring, Translation,
Notarization, Interpretation, and Transcription Services.
CUTTA accepts ongoing applications for Tutors and Translators.
You must be a full-time Columbia University/Barnard/Teaching College
student. Non-work study are eligible. This is an on-campus job, so
international students are also eligible.
Tutors: Needed in all subjects and levels for one-on-one tutoring.
Make your own schedule, locations on-campus and off-campus. Graduate
students are especially encouraged to apply. We particularly need
tutors in specialized sciences. Pay $30/hour plus $5 transportation
if off-campus.
Translators: Needed in all languages, must be fluent in English.
Translation and interpretation jobs available. Work from home and
make your own schedule. Speakers of rare languages are particularly
encouraged to apply! Pay $20/250 words ~ 1 manuscript page.
To apply please visit our website at www.columbia.edu/cu/ccs/cutta.
If you are interested in these jobs and have additional questions,
give us a call at (212) 854-4888 or e-mail us at cutta@columbia.edu.

9) The Club’s September program will feature Wayfarers, director
Ihor Strembitsky, the winner of Palme d’or for short films at the 2005
Cannes International Film Festival, and the critically acclaimed
documentary “Consonance”, director Viktoria Melnykova. In his
traditional introduction before the screening, Yuri Shevchuk,
director of the Club, will offer an update on many exciting
developments in Ukrainian filmmaking over the summer period. The
program will include surprise exclusive materials.When: September 22,
2005, Thursday, 7:30 PM. Where: Room 717, Hamilton Hall, Columbia
University.

HI everyone!

I hope that everyone is settled down with classes and their schedules, and
ready to start off another amazing year! There are plenty of activities
that are going to take place this week and the following week, and we
encourage you to come and to participate.

Take care and have fun,

Anastasiya Kobtseva
Ukrainian Club Secretary

Events:

1) Check out our table at the Club Fair this friday, September 9th.

2) Lemko Performance , Thursday, September 8th, 7:00pm.

3) Round table discussion at the Shevchenko Scientific Society, Saturday,
September 10th, 5:00pm.

4) YUSHCHENKO is coming to Columbia! Wednesday, September 14, 2005, 4:00
p.m. | Low Library

5) SLY FOX MUSIC SHOWCASE, Saturday, September 10th, 8PM (doors open 7:30)

6) NEW Ukrainian Course available to students during the Fall 2005
semester at Columbia

For more information about these events please read below:

I. Lemko Performance :

Location: It will take place in 301 Philosophy Hall (in the Student
Lounge, located on the first floor to the left;),
1150 Amsterdam Avenue, Columbia University,New York, NY 10027
Wine and cheese will be served at the reception after concert.

II. Round table discussion at the Shevchenko Scientific Society

Location: It will take place at
Shevchenko Scientific Society
63 Fourth Avenue
between 9th & 10th St.
New York, NY 10003, USA
Contact Information:
(tel) 212-254-5130
(fax) 212-254-5239

III. YUSHCHENKO is coming to Columbia!
Taking Power Peacefully: Reflections on the Post-Communist
Revolutions of 2000–2004
Mikheil Saakashvili, President of the Republic of Georgia
Boris Tadic, President of the Republic of Serbia
Viktor Yushchenko, President of Ukraine
Starting in Serbia with the overthrow of Slobodan Milosevic, then
moving on to Georgia with the Rose Revolution and to Ukraine with the
Orange Revolution, between 2000–2004 massive popular opposition
movements bloodlessly toppled corrupt regimes across the former
communist bloc. Composed of leading statesman from each of these
countries, this symposium will examine a variety of issues: the
dangers facing non-violent movements when confronting violent
regimes; how the ideas and tactics of non-violent protest travel from
country to country; the challenges of ensuring that democratic
revolutions remain democratic; and whether the examples of Serbia,
Georgia, and Ukraine provide a new model for large-scale, peaceful
protest against dictatorships around the world. Co-hosted by the
Harriman Institute.

For more information, please visit:

http://worldleaders.columbia.edu/index.html

IV. Sly Fox Showcase

Location: Sly Fox, 142 2nd Avenue at 9th Street, NYC
FEATURING
Stefko
Matt Miller
Chris Maher

Price: $5

For more info, check out the following pages :
Chris (www.myspace.com/chrismaher)
Stefko (www.myspace.com/stefko)
Matt (www.myspace.com/mattmillermusic)

V. NEW Ukrainian Course” Ukraine and the United Nations Through the Eyes
of a Ukrainian Ambassador: Diplomacy and Politics”

It is available to students during the Fall 2005 semester at Columbia. It
is a 1.5-credit course titled, “Ukraine and the United Nations Through
the Eyes of a Ukrainian Ambassador: Diplomacy and Politics". It will be
taught on
Wednesday evenings by Ambassador Valery Kuchinsky, Permanent
Representative of Ukraine to the United Nations. This course is open
both to registered Columbia students, and to members of the public
who wish to sit in on the class to listen. Please note that this
course BEGINS ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2005. More details about the course
can be found below, or by contacting Diana Howansky at
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu or (212) 854-4697.

Instructor: Ambassador Valery Kuchinsky

Course Overview: The aim of the course is to share the wide
experience of a career diplomat who has been linked with the United
Nations for decades. The course provides a comprehensive and
contemporary examination of the United Nations and its role in three
core issues of international relations: international peace and
security; human rights and humanitarian affairs; building peace
through sustainable development. It gives first-hand insights into
the politics of today’s multilateral diplomacy as it is conducted
within the United Nations framework and analyzes the inputs of
individual member-states.

Meeting Dates/Times: Wednesdays, starting September 27, 2005, from
6:10-8pm.

Location: Room 1219, International Affairs Building, Columbia
University, 420 W. 118th St., New York, NY 10027

Credits: 1.5

Prerequisites: None

Course Number: INAF U4575 Call Number: 78358

Grading: Grade to be determined based on attendance and participation
in discussions.

Readings: No assigned readings because it is a practicum; however,
excerpts from various UN documents, as well as a book on Ukraine and
the UN Security Council, will be provided.

Week-by-Week List of Class Schedule/Topics*:

Week 1, September 28: Introduction: From the San Francisco Conference
to the UN Millennium Summit.

Week 2, October 5: International Peace and Security.

Week 3, October 12: International Peace and Security. Peacekeeping
Operations.

Week 4, October 19: International Peace and Security. Disarmament.

Week 5, October 26: International Peace and Security. Ukraine’s
Experience as a Member of the Security Council.

Week 6, November 2: Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs.

Week 7, November 9: Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs: the
General Assembly, the Human Rights Commission, other bodies:
Ukraine’s Assessment.

Week 8, November 16: United Nations and the Fight Against
International Terrorism.

Week 9, November 23: Sustainable Human Development.

Week 10, November 30: Sustainable Human Development. The Millenium
Goals: Prospects for Implementation.

Week 11, December 7: The UN in the XXI Century: Urgent Need for Reform.

Week 12, December 14: The UN in the XXI Century. The 2005 Global
Summit and its Final Document. Summing up.

*This class schedule can be edited to hold one class at the UN during
the workday, so that students see its inner workings.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Vitau Druzi!!!

Hi, everyone!
Welcome back! I hope that everyone's summer has been filled with many
exiting moments, memories, and experiences. Now the summer is over, and it
is time to kick off with another great year. This year, Ukrainian Club is
planning to have many organized events within and outside the university.
Just keep on checking your e-mail for various happenings throughout the
year.

Just to remind everyone, my name is Anastasiya Kobtseva and i am a new
secretary of the Ukrainian Club, so expect to see a lot of e-mails from
me:).

So, forget all the unpacking, moving in, and etc. and come check out the
following events that are going to take place very soon:

1. Lemko Performance
2. Our table at club day
3. Round table discussion at the Shevchenko Scientific Society

Hope to see you all there, and don't forget, COME TO CHECK OUT OUR SET UP
TABLE ON COLLEGE WALK AND BRING YOUR FRIENDS! WE WANT MORE PEOPLE TO JOIN!

Plus you will get to meet some of the current AWESOME members.:) It's on
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 9TH.

Welcome back again and hope to see you all soon.

HERE ARE THE DETAILS:

The Ukrainian Studies Program and the Center for Ethnomusicology at
Columbia University
invite you to a performance of Lemko folk songs, followed by a wine and
cheese reception, featuring

JULIA DOSZNA

Born in the village of Bielanka in the Lemko region (now located in
south-eastern Poland), Julia Doszna will perform songs from her
newly-released album, titled “Immigrant.” Many of these Lemko folk
songs, depicting the life of immigrants who came to the U.S., have been
resurrected and not heard in over a hundred years. Julia Doszna, who
began her career singing with the folk group “Lemkovyna,” has performed
in numerous theaters and festivals in Poland and Ukraine, and previously
produced the albums “Tam na Lemkovyni” (There in Lemkovyna) and “Choho
plachesh” (Why Are You Crying?).

Julia will be accompanied on the piano by David Libby, who has worked as
a professional pianist in the United States for over 20 years and who,
while earning his Master’s of Music Degree from Rutgers University,
studied with jazz piano legend Kenny Baron.

When: Thursday, September 8th, 7:00pm (with wine/cheese reception
beginning after concert)
Where: 301 Philosophy Hall (in the Student Lounge, located on the first
floor to the left;), 1150 Amsterdam Avenue, Columbia University, New
York, NY 10027

Open to the public. RSVP to Diana Howansky at
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu or (212) 854-4697.

======================
Saturday Sep 10 2005

Roundtable: 2005 International Scholary Conferences :Donetsk, Berlin and Urbana-Champaign

Larissa Onyshkevych, Mark von Hagen,
Myroslava Znayenko, Leonid Rudnytzky, Taras Hunczak, Svitlana
Andrushkiw.

5:00 PM

Shevchenko Scientific Society
63 Fourth Avenue
between 9th & 10th St.
New York, NY 10003, USA
(tel) 212-254-5130
(fax) 212-254-5239

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WELCOME BACK!

(Notices for 2004-2005)