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Windows Vista, Business Edition - How to get a legal copy

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Adding SEAS students to the Microsoft Campus Agreement being debabated. Stay tuned.

IT Benefits To Know About
CEEM PC Lab

Department

Grads

Software to know about!

=Planned=

Through licensing genius that is CEEMIT and the generosity that is CEEM, our department has impressive Microsoft Software licensing rights through, MSNDAA. Among the many software titles available to all of CEEM is the new operating system Windows Vista, Business Edition.

How do I get Vista?
1) Bring a DVD to the PC Lab. A burnable DVD .ISO is stored on the D drive of the computer labeled CEEMPCL19 under the director path:
D:\STUDENT BURNABLE SOFTWARE\MSNDAA\

Tip: How do I burn an .ISO image?

2) You will need an authentication key to install Windows Vista.
Please contact me ceemit@civil.columbia.edu once you have burned your DVD. I can send the unique authentication codes to you via email or give them in person, upon request.

Note: Microsoft acknowledges that most people will get Vista with a new compatible pc. Although you can use it as an upgrade, the new OS is fairly demanding and thus, features may be limited on older computers.

See the following link for Windows Vista requirements and info:

Product comparisons.

Please note that CEEM only has access to the Business version. If you want the Ultimate edition, get your copy of business and then purchase the upgrade. Not sure of the costs for the upgrade atm, but it will be cheaper then a full purchase.
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/editions/default.mspx
Requirements.
Please note that for an enjoyable experience, you should take a systems recommended requirements and at least double them. The recommended is a baseline for what is required to run the program well, but does not necessarily take into account the running of other programs... virus protection, spyware protection, IM, Word, Excel, Photoshop, Dreamweaver.... etc.... So unless you just plan on running the OS and no programs, plan accordingly.
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/editions/business/default.mspx

And a semi-funny comparison of Windows vs. Macintosh:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT6YO30GhmQ

Also for the total nerd in you, apparently a very bad after school special with... is that Noah Wyle? The thing you come across on youtube, sheesh...
Pirates of Silicon Valley - Microsoft Steals from Apple.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=im589uTchKs

And finally, the best recent Apple commercial digging on Vista (UAC), a totally annoying security "feature" of Vista, imho. They nailed this one.
http://images.apple.com/movies/us/apple/getamac/apple-getamac-security_480x376.mov

Btw, if you want to turn off the Windows Annoying (UAC), User Account Control, see the how to page

My upgrade experience/testing.
Based on my tests, I personally am not satisfied with Window Vista's performance on older computer (3-4 years old). I installed it on a few computers, but most of my testing has been on a P4 2.8 GHz, 1gb DDR memory, 7400 rpm hard drive and a ATI Radeon 800 AGP video card. I found that some of my old video card drivers will not work (Nvidia GeForce4 MX (AGP-4X)-to be fair: approx 5-6 years old), programs stop responding and crash, the system seems sluggish and slow, Office 2007 pro crashes often. I personally and disturbed by MS's approach to safety, which is prompting you every time you do an action that might potentially harm your computer... no matter how small the action is... truly annoying. The "features" that I have seen and used are not that impressive. IT seems to me that MS just took other peoples ideas (like gadgets) and the Mac interface and rolled them into their new OS.

I will re-assess my opinion of Vista once I use it on a compatible newer computer. My current recommendation is that you consider not installing Vista on a production computer. Because of its newness and software compatibility issues, i recommend that if at all possible, install it on a less critical computer that you do not need to work 100%. Windows XP will still be supported for several years with security patches and updates. There is no reason to jump ship just yet, if you don't have to. The other option is to set it up to dual boot.

The final option will be what MS recommends and that is buying a new computer. If you go this route, be certain the new computer is Windows compatible, not just capable. You can avoid this question all together if you buy a computer with Windows Vista pre-installed or at least as an option. As long as its an option, you know its compatible.

 

 
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