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Kenneth ClarkKenneth Clark
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Session:         Page of 763

their children were relegated.

He's a powerful man. (Albert Shanker, Teachers' Union)

Q:

You're talking about a decentralized supervision or even administration of the schools.

Clark:

Yes. Right.

Q:

Shanker through his union wanted to keep it centralized.

Clark:

Yes. And now, you want to know the joke? That, after we succeeded in getting a perverted decentralization law, in which Mr. Shanker played the most important role in perverting to his ends, the chief beneficiary of that was Mr. Shanker and his union. They were able to manipute elections, you know, and what not, so that they controlled the significant local school districts.

The best example of that is District 1, you know, in the Fuentes struggle. (laughing) There is a curious ring to my laugh, isn't it?

Q:

Well, didn't Shanker foresee this possibility, that he would be able to move in one piece by piece basis?

Clark:

I don't think he saw that until near the end of the legislative struggle, because he made demands which he obtained, in terms of the change of the law, which -- and by the way, he was backed by the organized labor in the state, which I didn't realize had as high a stake in the maintenance of the status quo in the public school establishment as they did.





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