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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Heiskell:

Yes, I think that's correct. Yes. I don't think he put those issues on the same level as what he would have called “the big issues,” you know, war and peace, politics, and so on and so on.

Q:

What do you think were, if any, his political aspirations?

Heiskell:

Well, he made a vague pass at running for office in Connecticut. I think it was at somebody else's urging, probably Sam Pryor, or somebody like that. I think it's correct to say that the one post he would have enjoyed would have been Secretary of State. He didn't--I never felt that he wanted anything else in government.

Q:

Then he viewed himself as a world statesman? Is that correct?

Heiskell:

Yes, I think that probably is correct. I wouldn't have used that word, but yes--he really loved going around and talking with Adenauer or de Gasperi or, you know, the heads of state, about general world policies.

Q:

Well, in that sense, then, what was his view of his communications vehicle, i.e., his publications?

Heiskell:

They tended to reflect his views. He would come back from talking to Adenauer or de Gasperi or Nehru, or whoever, and report in full on everything that they have discussed, and what he thought, and so on and so on. And he was very interesting. I mean, he was very good at cross-examining them, and getting them to talk.



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