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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Q:

What was his method of--you've referred to him a number of times as patron--what was his method of leadership in the years he was active? I mean, there's all kinds of styles. Did people feel a loyalty to him? What kind of a leader was he?

Heiskell:

He was much more an idea leader--this is not the right word--than he was a personal leader. He didn't teach, enthuse, bring up people as much as he sort of outpaced them and forced them all to try to catch up with him. Of course, I don't remember him ever hiring anybody, but then, of course, we did very little hiring in Time Inc. from the outside--except in the early days, obviously, we did. But later on it was all growth from within. So I have a little trouble saying what was his judgment on people. They got awful screwed up in terms of management in the late 1930s, between Ingersoll and Larsen and Prentice and I guess a couple of others, and it ended up with Ingersoll, I guess, being fired. He pretty much tried to take over, and he and Roy Larsen were at odds. And I don't--I have no memory of anybody saying to me, “Well, thank God, there was Harry there to straighten it all out.” He apparently just left it there--left the lions in the cage and waited for one of them to come out victorious.

Q:

What was the impact of his death?

Heiskell:

Are you talking about emotionally or in terms of management structure and what have you?



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