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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Q:

But the whole question of planning. What do you think about what you just said? Do you think that there's any--

Heiskell:

What do I think? I don't believe in planning. I believe in having good ideas and making the commitment to good ideas. You know, they've had a magazine development operation going there for three years at enormous cost. As far as I could tell, they'd never made a decision about any of them. They dummied up ten or twelve magazines and that was it, except for Picture Week, which, thank God, they didn't go ahead with.

Q:

Talk about planning for a minute. You remember that--you might not remember this--this is according to, again, the Predergast. In 1969, I guess, there had been just so many projects that according to Predergast were up as possibilities of, you know, directions to go into that you--you--asked three outside board members--Gardner, Heard, and Sol Linowitz--to look at Time Inc.'s long-range planning and report to you. And apparently they thought that there should be a kind of a business analysis unit attached to the chairman's office, and nothing was really done about it. I just wanted to--

Heiskell:

I didn't believe in centralized planning, and I said, “It's up to the groups to plan their own future. It's not up to someone on the 34th floor who does not really know enough about cable television to plan cable television's future.” So I was against central planning. I wasn't against planning in toto, but against





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