Home
Search transcripts:    Advanced Search
Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
Photo Gallery
Transcript

Session:         Page of 824

really related at all, but to printing. Why won't you discuss a little bit the relationship of the company, through the years, with Donnelley, your printers, and anything that comes to mind of interest there.

Heiskell:

It goes way back--Harry Luce--I forget where we were first printed, but old T.E. Donnelley, the patriarch of the company--I think he propositioned Harry on printing Time--oh, 1920's, 1928, or something like that. And as we went along we relied primarily on Donnelley--for two reasons: you could count on them, and they were very quality-conscious. They were also expensive. They were probably 10% more expensive than other printers. We did have some other printers.

Q:

Originally they were, or as they realized that they had Time?

Heiskell:

They always have been, they always have been. I'm making a guess as to 10%. I know they're more expensive; you could buy cheaper. On the other hand, you could ask Donnelley to do a somersault on a Saturday night, and they would do a somersault on a Saturday night. They would do anything to get the job done.

Q:

Where they your captive? More or less, where you their whole business?

Heiskell:

Oh, no, no. We never were more than 15% of their gross.



© 2006 Columbia University Libraries | Oral History Research Office | Rights and Permissions | Help