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Frank StantonFrank Stanton
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Session:         Page of 755

Stanton:

Well, this was, I believe, in either the Kennedy or Johnson period. Two of the three guys committed to do it, and I refused to do it, said I would go public with it -- not immediately, but if he persisted I would go public with the idea. I was so serious in my stand against Pastore that I convened a special meeting of the CBS board to tell them of the stand I had taken against a very powerful leader in the Senate, who threatened all kinds of trouble if we didn't comply. One of the two other network presidents came over to see me, to beg me to comply lest I bring the house down on all three of us. It was that serious.

Q:

Who were the other network --?

Stanton:

Well, ABC and NBC.

Q:

Yes, but, the presidents at that time.

Stanton:

Oh. [Leonard] Goldenson and Julian Goodman, I think, was the other one. No. It was Bobby [David] Sarnoff. It wasn't a government code clearance. The National Association of Broadcasters had a code (no longer in existence because the Department of Justice broke it up), and the public knew about it, there wasn't anything secret about it. A lot of testimony before Congress, etc. They had a code committee that laid out a code of what was fit and proper to go on the air. It had to do with profanity and pornography, etc., and questions of security. We all lived, pretty much, by that code. It took a strong stand in favor of motherhood and didn't present any problem, but they never cleared anything. These were guidelines that you were presumably to follow, if you were a good boy -- or a good girl. What Pastore wanted was to activate that code committee, to set up a clearance for all questions that had -- for all program series or special movies that had anything that might be in





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