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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

hadn't been even to Europe. So Europe was way off there, and it was “none of our business” kind of attitude. Isolationism was more that than it was anything else. “Don't get mixed up with it.” We were brought up for two hundred years in “no foreign entanglements”--I believe George Washington said?

Q:

But you yourself in those late 30s were worried about Germany and about Europe and--

Heiskell:

Yes, well, I'd seen the beginnings of it. After all, I'd lived in Europe until '35, so I saw the rise of Germany. I'd lived in Germany in 1923, and saw the beginnings of it there. I saw the schism occur in France between the Communist factions and the right-wing factions and the splintering of the European continent, pretty much. Italy going one way--to dictatorship--and by then it moved into Abyssinia, Ethiopia. So I was probably more conscious of all of this than others. I always wanted to be a foreign correspondent! And nobody would let me.

Q:

How is it that you, in 1939, if I understand correctly, left the editorial side and went into the publishing side and became Assistant General--what was it?

Heiskell:

Assistant General Manager.

Q:

Yes, Assistant General Manager?



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