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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

Q:

Did it--I think it was Wainwright, Loudon Wainwright, in his book, ties that in with kind of--again, the downcurve of LIFE, and in a way, the end of the party era, with the great alcoholic culture. And I'm just curious what your response to that is. In other words, this being a symbol of the end of that.

Heiskell:

[sighs] Maybe it's a symbol but, you know, to prove the point they should have all shot themselves. [laughs] Only one did. You have to say to yourself: “there was something special about him that caused him to do it.” The other people weren't going around shooting themselves.

Q:

Okay. Let's talk about--let's go on to our next subject, which is--we're going to spend some time talking about Henry Luce. Okay? Let's start off by--

Heiskell:

Entitled: “Henry Robinson Luce.”

Q:

Exactly. Why won't you describe who some of the people who were very close to him, you know--the Moores, Claire--his relationships, his key relationships that you were cognizant of.

Heiskell:

Well, he had a sister, Elizabeth, an absolutely charming, lovely lady, still alive. As a matter of fact, I saw her last Saturday. And she married a young Cravath lawyer by the name of M.T. Moore, I think, shortly after World War I. He was known as Tex Moore because he came from that state, although he never acted as if he



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