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Notable New     Yorkers
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Andrew HeiskellAndrew Heiskell
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Session:         Page of 824

did. There was nothing big, rash, or what have you about him. He was a very serious, not very large man--he wasn't busting out all over by any means. He was well buttoned up and very careful, and very cautious. And he, early in the game, I think because of Elizabeth, became the lawyer for Time Incorporated, and tried to teach Harry how to conduct corporate affairs, corporate matters. After a while, Harry decided that it would be good to have such a person as chairman of the corporation, the corporation by then having a certain number of directors. This is way back in the 1920s. Artemus Gates, “Di” Gates, who became Assistant Secretary of the Navy during World War II and had been a flier in World War I, a Yale man--in those days most of the people were Yale men--Bill Griffin, who was a financial genius--

Q:

I'll tell you what. Instead of focusing on the early board--I want to talk about the board separately--just focus on Moore for a moment.

Heiskell:

Moore.

Q:

And Luce, and the people who were influential in his life. So focus on the relationship with Moore, or whoever else you think fits that build.

Heiskell:

But you see, these were--other than Hadden, these, in terms of Time Incorporated, were the people who had a considerable influence on Luce. They were not outside directors the way today you



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