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Frank StantonFrank Stanton
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Session:         Page of 755

his illness, but it didn't hit me the way that other relations have hit me. That was, I suppose, because I was, in part, unsure of myself and didn't want to expose to myself in areas where I thought I was incompetent or didn't have any experience. I remember saying to Bill in one of the very first meetings I had with him, “You take care of the night life, and I'll take care of the day life.” In other words, the social side of the job I wanted him to do; I'd do the business side. We saw very little of each other as husbands and wives. Mrs. [Barbara C. M. “Babe”] Paley has told mutual friends that she could never understand that behavior on our part -- that we weren't very warm or friendly. It wasn't that we weren't warm or friendly -- at least I hope it wasn't -- but rather that they were in a different world than we were in, and we chose we not to want to be in that world.

Q:

I'm not really from that world either. How would you describe that particular world in New York at that time? That he was in?

Stanton:

Cafe society. The rich and the famous. The beautiful people. These are labels that came later.

Q:

Who were his closest friends?

Stanton:

One was Jack [John Hay] Whitney. One was Jack [John] Baragwanath. I can't spell his name. I can give it to you. Jack Baragwanath was sort of his “man Friday.” He wasn't his social equal, in Bill's eyes, but he amused Bill. He lived with Bill in the complex out at Kiluna. Baragwanath's wife died early on in my relationship with Bill. Her name was Neysa McMein, who was I believe a great social artist. Off hand, I don't think of anyone in today's world that even comes close to the relationship that she had. She was in society, yet



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