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Frank StantonFrank Stanton
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other things that would supplement that income. And that just didn't hold any attraction for me at all. And banks were failing, buildings and loans were failing at that time for reasons that aren't dissimilar from what's happening today. And I thought unless I got a graduate degree -- at least I thought this. My reasoning was as follows: that if you had a couple of years to spend, to sit out the Depression, were you better off taking any job you could get and maybe ending up with a career pattern that wasn't of your choosing? Or was this the time to invest in graduate work and further education?

Q:

If I could just stop you for a minute -- at that time were you still interested in -- were you interested at all in a career in radio? I mean, I know radio was sort of the Depression-proof medium at that time but was it an established medium; enough so that--

Stanton:

Oh, no, it wasn't established. But it was growing by leaps and bounds. And I dropped out the fact that my brother very early on, when he was I guess ten or eleven, became an amateur radio operator. And built his own rig and he had the house wired for sound and so forth. So, I knew a little bit more about radio than just having an Atwater Kent receiver.

But that year that I'm describing which was '30, '31, I don't think I turned any attention to radio at that time. I certainly read trade publications having to do with radio. There was a magazine in those days called Advertising and Selling that I got acquainted with when I was working in display advertising. One page in Advertising and Selling was given to a column written by a man by the name of Edgar Felix. I remember very clearly because he was part engineer and part huckster. And he was writing about the successes and the growth of radio. But it had very little attention, even at that period in the leading trade publications. I don't



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