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Frank StantonFrank Stanton
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Session:         Page of 755

had forgotten all about that but that certainly was the -- it was radio coming to the rescue of a company that needed to get out its message very rapidly.

Q:

Do you have any -- I'd like to hear something about what CBS was like as a news and analysis --

Stanton:

News?

Q:

News and analysis medium at that time. Around the mid-thirties, the late-thirties. In terms of how people saw CBS. I know that Bill Paley had to testify in Washington to the FCC a number of times about -- there was a huge effort at radio reform during that period. And according to the book by Sally Smith, he created an image -- and I'd like for you to comment on this, whether you think it's true or not -- that CBS was a serious news organization as well. So, how much in a day's broadcasting would be given over to news, say, in 1938?

Stanton:

Over fifteen percent.

Q:

Over fifteen.

Stanton:

Probably more, probably closer to twenty. Well, I have to almost scratch my head to remember now what I'm talking about. In '32, I believe, or in '30, '31, '32, the networks were using newspapers and wire services like AP and UP for their sources of information. I'm not sure whether we were buying that service or getting it from the newspapers, just getting the newspapers on the street corner. Some place along at that time, the wire



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