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Frank StantonFrank Stanton
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Session:         Page of 755

Q:

Was this also in the fifties, or later?

Stanton:

Yes, this was in the fifties. This was before we moved over to the new -- to the building on Sixth Avenue. So that move took place in the early sixties -- sure, it was in the fifties. Tom [Thomas J.] Watson Jr. was chairman at that time.

Q:

Did you have any other offers that were very tempting, to leave CBS in the fifties, in the early sixties?

Stanton:

Not in the Fifties. I did in the Thirties and again in the Forties. In the Thirties I was wooed, if you will, by an advertising agency in Philadelphia. And later I was offered, or I was invited to sit down and talk with A.C. Nielsen, and then at several points along the way, advertising agencies came to me to talk with me about joining them. I was not tempted by the agencies. I did think seriously about the Nielsen opportunity. That came in the thirties. The reason I liked that was because it was an engineering-oriented group devoted to very serious statistical and market research problems. It wasn't a public opinion organization, although I think if I had joined it in the capacity that was discussed with me, I probably would have tried to take the company in the direction of doing polling as well as the kind of research that they were doing. But it is a company that's devoted almost exclusively to what I would call nose counting. The attitude of the consumer is only considered in relation to his expression or her expression at the cash register. I have always wanted to be interested not only in the nose-counting side but in the reasons for decision making in the marketplace or in the polling place. A.C. Nielsen Sr., Art Nielsen Sr. was a graduate of the Engineering School, I believe, at the University of Wisconsin. And all of his senior people were all graduate engineers. In fact, at the time he made the offer, he was quite clear in telling me that I



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